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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on March 26th, 2014
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

from:  Charles Ebinger, Brookings Institution FPEnergySecurity@brookings.edu

New Report: Oil and Gas in the Changing Arctic Region

Dear Colleagues:

The Arctic is changing. A shrinking polar icecap—now 40 percent smaller than it was in 1979—has opened not only new shipping routes, but access to 13 percent and 30 percent of the world’s undiscovered oil and gas, respectively.

Today, the region’s vast energy, mineral and marine resources draw substantial international and commercial interest.

What can the U.S. do to strengthen the Arctic offshore oil and gas governance regime as it takes over the chairmanship of the Arctic Council in 2015?

In a new report, Offshore Oil and Gas Governance in the Arctic: A Leadership Role for the U.S., authors Charles K. Ebinger, John P. Banks, and Alisa Schackmann review the current framework regarding offshore Arctic energy exploration, and recommend efforts the U.S. should take to assert leadership in the region, such as:

  • Establish oil spill prevention and response as a guiding theme for its Arctic Council chairmanship;
  • Appoint a U.S. Arctic ambassador;
  • Accelerate development of Alaska-specific oil and gas standards; and
  • Strengthen bilateral arrangements with Russia and Canada.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

  • Establish oil spill prevention, control, and response as the overarching theme for U.S. chairmanship of the Arctic Council in 2015-2017.
  • Create the diplomatic post of “Arctic Ambassador.”
  • Establish a Regional Bureau for Polar Affairs in the U.S. Department of State.
  • Accelerate the ongoing development of Alaska-specific offshore oil and gas standards and discuss their applicability in bilateral and multilateral forums for the broader Arctic region.
  • Strengthen bilateral regulatory arrangements for the Chukchi Sea with Russia, and the Beaufort Sea with Canada.
  • Support the industry-led establishment of an Arctic-specific resource sharing organization for oil spill response and safety.
  • Support and prioritize the strengthening of the Arctic Council through enhanced thematic coordination of offshore oil and gas issues.
  • Support the establishment of a circumpolar Arctic Regulators Association for Oil and Gas.

 

To learn more, watch this video and read the new policy brief from the Brookings Energy Security Initiative:

www.brookings.edu/ArcticEnergy

 

“I congratulate you and your collaborators on the report and
on the Energy Security Initiative. The active interest and involvement of Brookings in Arctic affairs is, and will be,
of enormous importance for the future development of the region.”

—H.E. Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, President of Iceland (written to Dr. Charles Ebinger)


We hope you will find this new report an informative primer on Arctic governance and a dependable reference in discussing Arctic affairs. We encourage your feedback by emailing ESI Project Coordinator Colleen Lowry at clowry@brookings.edu.

Warm regards,

Charles K. Ebinger
Director, Energy Security Initiative at Brookings

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on March 26th, 2014
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

   Josef Friedhuber/Getty Images

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on February 8th, 2014
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

 

Call for papers, The legal issues associated with the development and use of Arctic energy resources, Tromsø, September 2014.

from:  Nigel Bankes ndbankes@ucalgary.ca

 February 7, 2014

ENERGY LAW CONFERENCE

25-26 September 2014

Call for Papers

 

The legal issues associated with the development and use of Arctic energy resources

 

 

The Faculty of Law, at the University of Tromsø in conjunction with the K.G. Jebsen Centre for the Law of the Sea is pleased to announce the call for papers for the energy law conference on “The legal issues associated with the development and use of energy resources in the Arctic”.

 

You are invited to submit proposals to present a paper addressing the conference theme, broadly construed.

Without intending to be prescriptive, examples of topics that would fall within the scope of the conference include legal issues (domestic and international law) related to any of the following in an Arctic context:

the role of strategic and project-specific environmental assessments;

energy markets;

energy security in an Arctic context;

energy relations between the EU and Russia;

the energy relations of Nordic States;

energy relations between the EU and Arctic states;

the role of renewables in the Arctic including wind, geothermal, tidal; non-conventional energy resources such as gas hydrates;

the oil and gas leasing regimes of Arctic states; infrastructure issues (transmission lines and pipelines);

navigation and other law of the sea issues associated with getting Arctic resources to market; liability issues and liability regimes for energy projects; insurance issues; project financing issues;

delimitation of maritime zones and the management of transboundary hydrocarbon resources;

extended continental shelf claims;

energy resource projects on indigenous lands; social licence to operate;

climate change issues (e.g. regulation of black carbon); Arctic energy resources and endangered species;

energy as a human right;

energy efficiency;

regional governance issues (e.g. the role of the Arctic Council, OSPAR etc).

 

Proposals will be considered by the conference convenors on the basis of academic merit and policy significance and fit with the conference theme. Abstracts of no more than 500 words should be submitted to the convenors by April 30, 2014. Abstracts should be sent to maria.m.neves@uit.no.

 

We anticipate (depending on numbers) being able to cover the costs of hotel accommodation and meals for those selected to present papers.

 

For more information on the conference please visit our website www.uit.no/lawofthesea or contact christin.skjervold@uit.no.

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on November 10th, 2013
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

Henrik Ibsen 1828-1906 is for the Scandinavians what Shakespeare is for the Anglo-Saxons, Gogol and Chekhov for the Slavs or Cervantes for the Spaniards. These individuals saw man as he or she are and their writings become globalized. Take then a Bertolt Brecht “theater of ideas” approach to the staging of an Ibsen play – or a play of any of the great playwrights  – get the acting up to an intelligent level  so that there are hints to the daily live of the audience – don’t over-do it – let the audience participate  directly – and the show turns into an event. That is great theater today and ever.

While on Broadway a Tennessee Williams great play – “The Glass Menagerie” – is these days over-staged, over-laud, over expensive – a must for tourists that can afford $300 for a seat, across the river in Brooklyn, at the incomparable masterpiece Harvey Theater – named after Harvey Lichtenstein – who was a former dancer who became arts administrator and for 32-year  the executive director of the Brooklyn Academy of Music that he turned with his strong will from a struggling mainly unused opera house into a Mecca for new legitimate theater.  At the Academy building started out people like Robert Wilson and the yearly New Wave Festival was just a natural outgrowth. Then there was the need of a second theater and The Harvey Theater Hall was born just one block away on Fulton Street. Now foreign directors bring their companies from overseas to teach America how to get back to the promise of good theater. We just got to witness there a truly great production of a play, for one tenth of the cost of the Broadway theater, and got to learn a lot about ourselves as well. These foreigners truly understood the US, while the US theater on Broadway showed very little understanding of the foreigners that leave the theater there with a feeling of being had.

Looking up via the internet we found – “The Enemy of the People” (1882), follows earlier Ibsen plays, where controversial elements were important and even pivotal components of the action, but they were on the small scale of individual households. In An Enemy, controversy became the primary focus, and the antagonist was the entire community. One primary message of the play is that the individual, who stands alone, is more often “right” than the mass of people, who are portrayed as ignorant and sheep-like. Contemporary society’s belief was that the community was a noble institution that could be trusted, a notion Ibsen challenged.

In An Enemy of the People, Ibsen chastised not only the conservatism of society, but also the liberalism of the time. He illustrated how people on both sides of the social spectrum could be equally self-serving.

An Enemy of the People was written as a response to the people who had rejected his previous work, Ghosts. The plot of the play is a veiled look at the way people reacted to the plot of Ghosts. In “Enemy” the protagonist is a physician in a vacation spot whose primary draw is a public bath. The doctor discovers that the water is contaminated by the local tannery. He expects to be acclaimed for saving the town from the nightmare of infecting visitors with disease, but instead he is declared an ‘enemy of the people’  by the locals, who band against him and even throw stones through his windows.
The play ends with his complete ostracism. It is obvious to the reader that disaster is in store for the town as well as for the doctor.

Then the source continues – As audiences by now expected, Ibsen’s next play again attacked entrenched beliefs and assumptions; but this time, his attack was not against society’s mores, but against overeager reformers and their idealism. Always an iconoclast, Ibsen was equally willing to tear down the ideologies of any part of the political spectrum, including his own.   Ibsen thus liked more the interaction of positions rather then the taking of a position. In effect the whole society is being criticized by Ibsen.

The Wild Duck (1884)  that followed The Enemy is by many considered Ibsen’s finest work, and it is certainly the most complex. It tells the story of Gregers Werle, a young man who returns to his hometown after an extended exile and is reunited with his boyhood friend Hjalmar Ekdal. Over the course of the play, the many secrets that lie behind the Ekdals’ apparently happy home are revealed to Gregers, who insists on pursuing the absolute truth, or the “Summons of the Ideal”. Among these truths: Gregers’ father impregnated his servant Gina, then married her off to Hjalmar to legitimize the child. Another man has been disgraced and imprisoned for a crime the elder Werle committed. Furthermore, while Hjalmar spends his days working on a wholly imaginary “invention”, his wife is earning the household income.

Dr. Stockman is the idealist who naively believes he can win by being right, but then encounters the truth that all levels of society are corrupt. Some start on the corruption path knowingly and others backstep into it because circumstances might otherwise turn them into major losers.
Nobody is ready to lose intentionally.

The Enemy that hit the Harvey Theater comes from the Schaubuhne at the Lehniner Platz (The Lenin Square) in what used to be East Berlin. The artistic genius – Director Thomas Ostermeier -  was responsible for this production as he was for several previous shows that were seen previously at the BAM.

The acting was impeccable – down to the facial expressions of the stage dog. There were minutes of talking without words and you knew exactly what they were saying. Only very seldom did the actors shout – and that was in cases of natural crescendo. I was able to understand the clear German and compliment it with the flashed English. The updates were in many cases just results on inflection and accent rather then as changes in wording. Nevertheless we understood that the closing of the bath would lead to unimaginable economic losses that the town will not allow. The vested interests were ready to fight back and had already prepared an alternate study that says there is nothing at fault with those waters – this sort of the Koch Brothers funded pseudo-scientific studies that say there is no man-made global warming.

Then, if one was going to do any changes to the water system it would cost money and nobody will want to pay higher taxes in order to pay-off the debt that the town will incur. In the end this becomes the common attitude to all those involved – just like in the USA of 2013. At this point some of the actors moved over to the audience and an exchange started that brought in regular members of the audience. When eventually Dr. Stockman is bombarded with paint balls the audience seems like having been wrestled down as well – though those balls originated from the theater hall.

YES – WE ARE ALL THE ENEMIES OF THE PEOPLE – this because except for Dr. Stockman and his faithful wife nobody is left with ideals – and the young couple themselves have been presented with the shares of those baths, bought up by the father in law who invested in this the money that he had intended originally for them as inheritance. Now they can be rich if they only declare that they have a way to save those baths.

 

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on October 19th, 2013
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

 

The following I learned, Thursday October 10, 2013, coincidentally at a breakfast meeting of the new series at he Green Tech Investors Forum run by Dr. Gelvin Stevenson and hosted by the New York Offices of the International law Firm Crowell &  Moring.

I said coincidentally because that day I was traveling to Reykjavik, Iceland, for the First International Conference of the Arctic Circle Nations, October 11-14, 2013. This Conference, as it turned out, was mainly concerned in the creation of wealth in the old way, but viewing  now on how it will be possible to using the access to the newly un-covered-of-ice waters and lands of the Arctic.

There could not have been a more contrasting set of visions then those exposed at the Manhattan event and the general spirit that drove the organizers of the Harpa Conference Center at the Reykjavik event. These two events will bring me back to post about pure SUSTAINABILITY after having lately been focused rather on the melt-down of the United States that to me was a much more frightening perspective then the climate change induced melting of the ice-caps at the three poles.

In the present posting I will be dealing with concepts put forward by Mr. Jigar Shah, the Star speaker at the Manhattan event. This will  follow  material from the other presenters before the Green Tech Investors Forum. Then, in following postings, I will be dealing with specifics from the Reykjavik meeting, and I foresee a series of postings about what can create Sustainable Wealth and what can be seen rather as a throw-back to past mistakes.

DSCI0056

——————————————————————————-

we already posted:

Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on April 10th, 2013

- See more at: www.sustainabilitank.info/2013/04…

 

and the full program of the Conference/meeting as provided several days before the event and which we posted October 10th so I could provide the link to the people present at the Manhattan event:

Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on October 10th, 2013

- See more at: www.sustainabilitank.info/2013/10…

——————————————————————————–

The Manhattan meeting was about a new company that has new proprietary technology or billing purpose – “Simply Grid” – it provides a solution for on-demand access to electricity.

The company’s proprietary technology includes a custom engineered controller which is deployed either within industry standard electric charging stations or as an augmentation to standard in-wall electrical outlets, and an Internet based management and billing system which allows for the automated initiation/termination of electric service via mobile app or text message, monitoring of usage, and billing. 

Simply Grid focuses on three markets: the mobile food industry, marinas and RV parks, and personal electronics in cafes and other public spaces.

 There are over 25,000 food carts and food trucks in the US, and they are expanding rapidly. Their legacy source of energy, gas or diesel powered generators, is expensive, polluting and noisy. Simply Grid’s solution – usually a four-foot high pedestal – enables private lot managers and municipalities to provide electricity to these vendors at a significant cost savings while providing a more pleasant environment for their customers.

 

 Simply Grid has a pilot in Union Square, midtown Manhattan, – with a food-cart vendor – Rafiqi’s – on the north side of the Square – in conjunction with the Mayor’s Office, ConEd, and NYC Department of Transportation. Additionally, the company has already deployments at food truck parks in Austin, TX and Atlanta, GA.

 

 Food carts’ portable generators—used by about 60% of all food carts—emit twenty times more particulate matter and other asthma-causing pollutants than NYC’s electric supply.

Simply Grid’s technology allows lot owners and municipalities to provide grid electricity to them, which makes them cleaner, quieter, and more profitable.

Electricity is made available to these vendors via outlets in industry standard electricity pedestals which have been customized with proprietary metering controllers. The controllers connect wireless to Simply Grid’s cloud-based platform which manages customer accounts, metering, and billing.

The system allows vendors  on city streets and RV lots to initiate service with their mobile phones and connect to the electric grid with cables they already use with their generators.The food vendors will be able to sell electricity to electric vehicles – cars, bikes etc. This will help clean up the air in cities by making it more feasible to use electric vehicles. Obviously, the electricity supply is a separate topic – but the decreased dependence on diesel and gasoline is clear. In this respect it is a company that does not only owe its success to efforts to decrease effects that cause global warming i.e. the use of petroleum products, but it also provides new lines of income to vendors of other services, and economically thus creates “CLIMATE WEALTH.”

The speakers at the meeting were SIMPLY GRID officials -Mike Dubrovsky; CEO, Jeffrey Hoffman,  COO;  Samuel Abbay, Co-Founder and Co-CEO. Present, and separate speaker, was partner and initiator of the “CREATING CLIMATE WEALTH” concept Jigar Shah who made already a lot of money when he created “SunEdison” – now a very successful company with billions in sales, and which he sold so he can go on creating new ideas and companies.

Creating Climate Wealth guru, Jigar Shah, is the real focus of this posting, and his just released manual – the book that is part autobiography and part blue-print for the future is:

“CREATING CLIMATE WEALTH: UNLOCKING THE IMPACT ECONOMY” caries ISBN: 978-0-9893531-0-6 – ICOSA publishing - www.icosamedia.com/publishing. It costs $21.95 and is a true manual.

Further information at www.creatingClimateWealth.com

—————————————————————–

Carl Pope, the former Executive Director of Sierra Club, writes among those that recommend this book – “Shah shows that a new massive wealth opportunity is at our fingertips, linking sustainability and economic development.”

We completely subscribe to this and must remark that Jigar Shah was able to show that the innovative management ideas that he promotes are not dependent on new technologies but rather on the imagination that frees us to use beneficially existing technologies in novel ways – this without government subsidies and rather in a pure private enterprise way. Obviously, this can be made possible only if government does not insist in interfering by supporting existing interests opposed to change.

“Creating Climate Wealth” introduces the general idea that natural resources fail us if we do not start a development with the concept that we want to answer a need, rather then pushing the sale of an exhaustible stash of resources – i.e. found fossil fuels or minerals.

Following that, we get the example of the creation of the SunEdison Company that came about to answer the need for cheap locally produced electricity, and eventually leads to the creation of the new company, the subjet of the October 10th meeting – “SimplyGrid” – that will eventually sell Renewable Energy via a smart grid. All this to be done by private investors that all what they need is non-interference from the government.

The important thing is that Jigar Shah is an entrepreneur who grew up in a home where his parents were already steeped in the spirit of entrepreneurship. JIGAR IS OUT TO MAKE MONEY IN A CLEVER WAY – AS SAID BY INNOVATING MANAGEMENT SO HE ANSWERS A TRUE NEED EFFICIENTLY AND AT LOWER COSTS THEN THE COMPETITION. Further, he structures his business plan so that all what he needs is a good client and he does not involve the client in his building the company.

SunEdison takes advantage of the vast roof space of large companies and puts there photovoltaics built with -off-the-shelf parts.
No waiting here for improvements that might take years, and no talk here of experimentation.

The client does not invest a penny – only agrees to buy the electricity at a price well below what it costs him today. Jigar finds the investors outside the product buying company and totally without government help except that he must make sure that existing electricity production companies do not cause the government to grant them a monopoly that would not allow this upstart to sell electricity. This is not a theoretical comment – it is rather a description of the sick US economy.

To get the details of this innovative way of doing business. and to realize the deep thoughts that went into Jigar’s choice of companies which he approached first, and the financial backers which he approached so that this will be a growing company with ever increasing revenues and financing, rather then a one time shot by a wise guy – please go to the sources which I presented here.

I read the book on the plane ride to Reykjavik, so it helped me be a little more critical of what I heard there.

 

 

 

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on October 10th, 2013
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

WHERE

 

Harpa Conference Centre

 

Austurbakki 2,

 

101 Reykjavík, Iceland

en.harpa.is/harpa/accessibility

www.ArcticCircle.org

CONTACT 

 

Margrét Stefánsdóttir

 

margret@meetingiceland.com

 

+354- 892-7163

Arctic Circle | PO Box 133 | Reykjavik | Iceland

WHO 

President Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson; Special Envoy of President Vladimir Putin to the Arctic, Artur Chilingarov; Greenland Premier, Aleqa Hammond,; U.S. Senator, Tom Harkin; U.S. Senator from Alaska Lisa Murkowsky; Google Executive Chairman, Eric Schmidt, The Presidents of Iceland and Breenland and the Prime Minister of the Faroe Islands, a former Prime Minister of France – Mr. Michel Rocard representing President Hollande and more.

Anticipated to be the largest and most diverse gathering of its kind, this event will include participants from Australia, Austria, Bangladesh, Belgium, Bhutan, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greenland, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Italy, the Republic of Korea, Monaco, Nepal, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Rwanda, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Vatican City State. As of now there are 900 registrants and there is a large confirmed program.

The Arctic is now playing a significant role in issues such as globalization, economic development, energy exploration, environmental protection and international security. Plans for resource use and new sea routes linking Asia to Europe and America have led to an increased focus on the region.

 

 The mission of the Arctic Circle is to facilitate dialogue and build relationships to address rapid changes in the Arctic. The Assembly will strengthen the decision-making process by bringing together international partners to interact under one large “open tent.” This is a new mechanism for existing institutions to reach a global audience in an efficient way.

WHEN

The meetings – October 12-14, 2013

 

 

PROGRAM DRAFT | CONFIRMED SESSIONS AND SPEAKERS

(Last updated on October 7, 2013.)

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11

18:00–20:00 WELCOME RECEPTION
Reykjavík Art Museum

Hosted by Arctia Shipping

Music by Guitar Islancio

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12

07:30–08:30 COFFEE SOCIAL

Hosted by Olgoonik Corp. and Pt Capital08:30–10:10PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 1: OPENING SESSION (08:30–10:10)

SPEAKERS:

Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, President, Iceland

Aleqa Hammond, Premier, Greenland

Kaj Leo Holm Johannesen, Prime Minister, Faroe Islands

Lisa Murkowski, U.S. Senator

Patrick Borbey, Chair, Senior Arctic Officials, Arctic Council, and President, Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor)

Anton Vasiliev, Ambassador at Large, Arctic Cooperation, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Russia
CHAIR:

Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Alaska Dispatch
VIDEO MESSAGES:

Hillary Rodham Clinton, Former Secretary of State, United States

Ban Ki-Moon, Secretary-General, United Nations

HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco

10:10–10:25COFFEE BREAK

Hosted by Esri10:25–13:10PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 2: CLIMATE CHANGE: A PLAN FOR ACTION? (10:25–11:45)

VIDEO MESSAGE:

Al Gore, Former Vice President, United States, and Nobel Laureate
SPEAKERS:

Enric Sala, Explorer-in-Residence, National Geographic Society

Tom Harkin, U.S. Senator

Mark Halle, Vice President, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)

Sergio C. Trindade, President, SE2T International, and Nobel Laureate

Johan van de Gronden, Chief Executive Officer, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Netherlands

Ghislaine Maxwell, Founder, The TerraMar Project
CHAIR:

Olav Orheim, Member, Scientific and Technical Committee, Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation

PLENARY SESSION 3: SHORT FILM: “LAST HOURS” (11:45–11:55)

“Last Hours” is the first in a series of short films from Tree Media Foundation that explore the perils of climate change and the solutions to avert climate disaster.

PLENARY SESSION 4: ARCTIC ICE MELT: GLOBAL WEATHER EVENTS (11:55–13:10)

VIDEO MESSAGE:

Rajendra K. Pachauri, Chair, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and Nobel Laureate
SPEAKERS:

Li Yuansheng, Deputy Director, Polar Research Institute of China (PRIC)

Karin Lochte, Chair, Alfred Wegener Institute

Minik Rosing, Professor, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen

Helgi Björnsson, Research Professor, Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland

Ingibjörg Jónsdóttir, Associate Professor, Faculty of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland
CHAIR:

Alexander Borodin, MHC (Services) Ltd.
VIDEO MESSAGE:

James Balog, Photographer, National Geographic (“Chasing Ice”)

13:10–13:40LUNCH13:40–16:10PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 5: SINGAPORE IN THE ARCTIC (13:40–14:15)

SPEAKER:

Sam Tan Chin Siong, Senior Parliamentary Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Singapore

PLENARY SESSION 6: ARCTIC GEOPOLITICS (14:15–14:45)

SPEAKER:

Strobe Talbott, President, Brookings Institution

PLENARY SESSION 7: ARCTIC ENERGY COOPERATION (14:45–16:00)

Arctic Energy Summit Report

SPEAKER:

Nils Andreassen, Executive Director, Institute of the North
Oil and Gas: Problems and Possibilities

SPEAKERS:

Heiðar Már Guðjónsson, Chairman of the Board, Eykon Energy

Rúni M. Hansen, Vice President, Arctic Unit, Statoil

Anthony Hodge, President, International Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM)

Jörg Ranau, Deputy Director-General for Economic Affairs, Federal Foreign Office, Germany

Bae Sung-Ho, Senior Researcher, Global Energy Cooperation Center, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Korea
CHAIR:

Charles K. Ebinger, Director, Energy Security Initiative, Brookings Institution

PLENARY SESSION 8: LAUNCH OF ARCTIC YEARBOOK 2013: THE ARCTIC OF REGIONS VS. THE GLOBALIZED ARCTIC (16:00–16:10)

SPEAKER:

Lassi Heininen, Professor, University of Lapland, and Editor, Arctic Yearbook

Heather Exner-Pirot, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Saskatchewan, and Co-Managing Editor, Arctic Yearbook

16:10–19:00BREAKOUT SESSIONSThese and the other breakout sessions in this agenda are organized by the participating organizations.

BREAKOUT SESSION A: ARCTIC SECURITY

Organized by the Northern Research Forum (NRF) and the UArctic-NRF Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security
Changes in a State of Security in the Arctic

SPEAKERS:

Lassi Heininen, Professor, University of Lapland

Heather Exner-Pirot, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Saskatchewan

Michal Luszczuk, Faculty Member, Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce

Steven Lamy, Professor of International Relations and Vice Dean for Academic Programs, Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, University of Southern California
The Nexus of Extractive Industries, the Environment and Climate Change: An Arctic (Security) Paradox

SPEAKERS:

Margrét Cela, Project Manager, Centre for Arctic Policy Studies (CAPS), University of Iceland, and Ph.D. Candidate, University of Lapland

Sóley Kaldal, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Iceland

Baozhi Cheng, Research Fellow, Shanghai Institutes for International Studies (SIIS)

Aki Tonami, Researcher, Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS), University of Copenhagen

Matthias Finger, Professor, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)

BREAKOUT SESSION B: BUSINESS COOPERATION: INDUSTRY LEADERSHIP AND COLLABORATION FOR RESPONSIBLE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE ARCTIC

Organized by the World Ocean Council
SPEAKERS:

Sarah Barton, Chief Strategy Officer, Arctic Fibre Inc. and Quintillion Networks

Robert J. Blaauw, Senior Advisor, Global Arctic Theme, Shell International Exploration and Production B.V.

Sven-Olof Lindblad, President and Founder, Lindblad Expeditions

Gylfi Sigfússon, President and Chief Executive Officer, Eimskip

Mikael Thinghuus, Chief Executive Officer, Royal Greenland A/S
CHAIR:

Paul Holthus, Chief Executive Officer, World Ocean Council
Arctic Industry Panel: Industry Perspectives on Responsible Economic Development in the Arctic and the Value of Business Cooperation

MODERATOR:

Hans Christian Krarup, Denmark Country Director, Golder Associates

Panel Discussion: Further Developing an Arctic Business Leadership Council and Multi-Industry Collaboration and Leadership on Responsible Business Development in the Arctic Region

MODERATOR:

Tim Lunel, Support and Development Director, International Tankers Owners Pollution Federation (ITOPF)

Open Forum Discussion with the Arctic Business Community: Advancing Business Cooperation and Developing the Structure and Process for Fostering Cooperation

MODERATOR:

Theodore L. Rockwell, Alaska Regional Coordinator, Business Development, Energy and Environment, Battelle Memorial Institute

BREAKOUT SESSION C: HUNTERS AND FISHERMEN: FIRST-HAND OBSERVATIONS AND PERSPECTIVES

SPEAKERS:

Tønnes Berthelsen, Deputy Manager, KNAPK (Association of Fishermen and Hunters in Greenland)

Raychelle Daniel, Senior Associate, U.S. Arctic Program, Pew Environment Group

Anders J. H. Eira, Economist and Reindeer Herder

Steinar Pedersen, Associate Professor, Sámi University College, and Subsistence Salmon Fisherman

BREAKOUT SESSION D: ARCTIC LESSONS FOR THE HIMALAYAN/THIRD POLE REGION

Organized by the Climate Research Fund, the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) and the Skoll Global Threats Fund

PARTICIPANTS:

Frederik Paulsen, Founder, Paulsen Editions

Yao Tandong, Director, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Mihir Shah, Member, Planning Commission, Government of India

David James Molden, Director General, International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD)

Pema Gyamtsho, Member, Parliament of Bhutan

Linxiu Zhang, Professor and Deputy Director, Centre for Chinese Agricultural Policy, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Anil Kulkarni, Scientist, Indian Institute of Science

Eklabya Sharma, Director, Programme Operations, International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD)

Anil Gupta, Director, Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology

Ghulam Rasul, Chief Meteorologist, Pakistan Meteorological Department

Ravi Singh, Secretary-General and Chief Executive Officer, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) India

Arunabha Ghosh, Chief Executive Officer, Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW)

Mahmood Akhtar Cheema, Country Representative, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Pakistan

Ravindra Kumar Shakya, Vice Chairman, National Planning Commission of Nepal

Napa Bikram Kishore Tripura, Secretary, Ministry of Chittagong Hill Tracts Affairs of Bangladesh

Atiq Rahman, Executive Director, Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies

Qazi Kholiquzzaman Ahmad, Chairman, Palli Karma-Sahayak Foundation

Karma Toeb, Glaciologist, Department of Geology and Mines, Bhutan

Ganesh Pangare, Head, Water Programme, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Thailand

BREAKOUT SESSION E: UNIVERSITY OF THE ARCTIC: BOARD OF GOVERNORS MEETING

Closed Meeting (By Invitation Only)
UArctic is a cooperative network of more than 150 universities, colleges and other organizations dedicated to education, research and the promotion of indigenous and local capacities and sustainable development in the circumpolar North.

BREAKOUT SESSION F: THE SCIENCE OF ICE: GLOBAL RESEARCH COOPERATION

Organized by the Icelandic Centre for Research (RANNIS) and the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC)

Participants from RANNIS, the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC), the Alfred Wegener Institute, the Polar Research Institute of China, the U.S. Arctic Research Commission, Le Cercle Polaire, the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs (COMNAP) and other Arctic organizations and scientific institutions

SPEAKERS:

Edward Itta, Commissioner, U.S. Arctic Research Commission

Li Yuansheng, Deputy Director, Polar Research Institute of China (PRIC)

Karin Lochte, Chair, Alfred Wegener Institute

Laurent Mayet, Director, Le Cercle Polaire, and Special Advisor to Michel Rocard

Olav Orheim, Member, Scientific and Technical Committee, Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation
CHAIR:

Thorsteinn Gunnarsson, Head, Division of Evaluation and Analysis, Icelandic Centre for Research (RANNIS), and Council Member, International Arctic Science Committee (IASC)
RAPPORTEUR:

Amy L. Wiita, President and Principal Research Scientist, Cinza Research LLC

BREAKOUT SESSION G: ICE2SEA CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE INTERGOVERNMENTAL PANEL ON CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT: UNDERSTANDING ICE LOSS AND SEA-LEVEL RISE

Organized by the British Antarctic Survey
SPEAKERS:

David Vaughan, Science Leader, British Antarctic Survey

Guðfinna Aðalgeirsdóttir, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland

BREAKOUT SESSION H: BUILDING CAPACITY IN ABORIGINAL COMMUNITIES: RELEVANT AND ACCESSIBLE EDUCATION IN THE NORTH

Organized by Yukon College
SPEAKERS:

Tosh Southwick, Director, First Nation Initiatives, Yukon College

Karen Barnes, President, Yukon College

BREAKOUT SESSION I: FILM SCREENING: “VANISHING POINT”

Organized by Meltwater Media

This documentary tells the story of two Inuit communities—one on Canada’s Baffin Island, the other in Northwest Greenland—and explores the consequences of rapid social and environmental change. The screening will be followed by a question-and-answer session with the director.

19:00OPEN RECEPTION AT HARPA19:30–22:30RECEPTION AND DINNER (BY INVITATION)

Hosted by Guggenheim Partners

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13

07:30–08:30 COFFEE SOCIAL

Hosted by Arion Bank08:30–10:15PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 9: NORTHERN SEA ROUTES: A NEW ERA IN GLOBAL SHIPPING (08:30–09:45)

SPEAKERS:

Yunpeng Li, President, China Ocean Shipping (Group) Co. (COSCO Group)

Dmitry Pourim, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Sovfracht

Gylfi Sigfússon, President and Chief Executive Officer, Eimskip

Nils Andersen, Group Chief Executive Officer, A.P. Moller-Maersk

Ásbjörn Gíslason, Chief Executive Officer, Samskip
CHAIR:

Felix H. Tschudi, Chairman and Owner, Tschudi Group
The Russian Legislative Framework for the Northern Sea Route

SPEAKERS:

Mikhail Slipenchuk, Deputy, State Duma, Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation

PLENARY SESSION 10: ARCTIC BUSINESS COOPERATION: INVESTOR OUTLOOK (09:45–10:15)

SPEAKER:

Scott Minerd, Global Chief Investment Officer, Guggenheim Partners

10:15–10:30BREAK10:30–13:00PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 11: LAW OF THE SEA (10:30–11:30)

Organized by the Symposium on Polar Law
SPEAKERS:

Erik Franckx, Professor of International Law, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)

Tomas H. Heidar, Legal Adviser, Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Iceland

Bjarni Már Magnússon, Specialist, School of Law, Reykjavík University

Larry Mayer, Professor of Earth Science and Ocean Engineering, University of New Hampshire

Philip Steinberg, Professor of Political Geography, Durham University
CHAIR:

Bosse Hedberg, Ambassador of Sweden to Iceland

PLENARY SESSION 12: THE ALASKAN STATE OF THE ARCTIC (11:30–12:15)

Underwritten by Ukpea?vik Iñupiat Corp.

SPEAKERS:

Lisa Murkowski, U.S. Senator

Mead Treadwell, Lieutenant Governor, State of Alaska

Reggie Joule, Mayor, Northwest Arctic Borough, Alaska
CHAIR:

Scott Borgerson, Chief Executive Officer, CargoMetrics Inc.
VIDEO MESSAGE:

Mark Begich, U.S. Senator

PLENARY SESSION 13: RUSSIA AND THE ARCTIC (12:15–13:00)

SPEAKER:

Artur Chilingarov, Explorer and Special Envoy of President Vladimir Putin to the Arctic
CHAIR:

Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, President, Iceland

13:00–13:30LUNCH13:30–15:00BREAKOUT SESSIONS (WORKING LUNCHES)

Lunch will be provided

BREAKOUT SESSION A: ARCTIC SECURITY (CONTINUED)

Organized by the Northern Research Forum (NRF) and the UArctic-NRF Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security
Future History of (State) Sovereignty and (National) Security in the Globalized Arctic

SPEAKERS:

Sandra Maria Rodrigues Balão, Assistant Professor, Technical University of Lisbon

Andreas Raspotnik, Research Fellow, University of Cologne

Alexander Sergunin, Professor, School of International Relations, St. Petersburg State University

Dorothée Cambou, Ph.D. Candidate, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)

Heather N. Nicol, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, Trent University

BREAKOUT SESSION D: ARCTIC LESSONS FOR THE HIMALAYAN/THIRD POLE REGION (CONTINUED AS NEEDED)

Organized by the Climate Research Fund, the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) and the Skoll Global Threats Fund

BREAKOUT SESSION J: POLAR LAW

Organized by the Symposium on Polar Law
Arctic Resource Development: Arctic Energy Meets Polar Law

SPEAKERS:

Mikhail Babenko, Oil & Gas Officer, Global Arctic Program, World Wildlife Fund (WWF)

Niels Einarsson, Director, Stefansson Arctic Institute

Theodore L. Rockwell, Alaska Regional Coordinator, Business Development, Energy and Environment, Battelle Memorial Institute

Larry Mayer, Professor of Earth Science and Ocean Engineering, University of New Hampshire

Maaike Knol, Researcher, Norwegian College of Fishery Science, Faculty of Biosciences, Fisheries and Economics, University of Tromsø
CHAIR:

Betsy Baker, Associate Professor and Senior Fellow for Oceans and Energy, Institute for Energy and the Environment, Vermont Law School

BREAKOUT SESSION K: ARCTIC INFRASTRUCTURE AND INVESTMENT: THE VIEW FROM ALASKA

Organized by the Arctic Imperative Summit, Olgoonik Corp. and Pt Capital

Investment in the Arctic: A Careful Balance

SPEAKERS:

Hugh Patkotak Sr., Chairman of the Board of Directors, Olgoonik Corp.

Mary Jane Lang, Chief Executive Officer, Olgoonik Corp.

Kevin Hand, President, Commercial Division, Olgoonik Corp.

James Pass, Managing Director, Guggenheim Partners

Hugh Short, Chief Executive Officer, Pt Capital

CHAIR:

Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Alaska Dispatch
Ports and Infrastructure

SPEAKERS:

Gail R. Schubert, President and Chief Executive Officer, Bering Straits Native Corp.

Mark L. Smith, Chief Executive Officer, Vitus Energy, and Former Mayor, Aleknagik, Alaska

Bob Herron, Representative, Alaska House of Representatives

CHAIR:

Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Alaska Dispatch

BREAKOUT SESSION L: THE ARCTIC INSTITUTE: INTERDISCIPLINARY ARCTIC CLIMATE AND ECOSYSTEM CHANGE

SPEAKERS:

Cecilia Bitz, Professor, Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington

Michael Macrander, Science Lead, Shell Alaska

Mark Myers, Vice Chancellor for Research, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Eric Steig, Professor, Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington
CHAIR:

Fran Ulmer, Chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission

BREAKOUT SESSION M: FINNAFJORD HARBOR: A NEW HUB IN THE CENTRAL NORTH ATLANTIC

SPEAKERS:

Hafsteinn Helgason, Director of Business Development, EFLA Consulting Engineers

Robert Howe, Managing Director, Bremenports

BREAKOUT SESSION N: HEALTH AND WELL-BEING IN THE ARCTIC

Organized by the University of Akureyri

SPEAKERS:

Elín Ebba Ásmundsdóttir, Associate Professor, University of Akureyri

Árún K. Sigurðardóttir, Professor, University of Akureyri

Kristín Þórarinsdóttir, Lecturer, University of Akureyri

Kristín Guðmundsdóttir, Assistant Professor, University of Akureyri
CHAIR:

Kristinn P. Magnússon, Professor, University of Akureyri and Icelandic Institute of Natural History

BREAKOUT SESSION O: ARCTIC BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

Organized by Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF), the biodiversity working group of the Arctic Council

Presentation, film screening and question-and-answer period

SPEAKER:

Tom Barry, Executive Secretary, Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF)

Lawrence Hislop, Head, Polar Division, GRID-Arendal, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

BREAKOUT SESSION P: THE EMERGING RISKS AND THE ARCTIC BIOECONOMY

Organized by Matís and the University of Iceland’s Research Centre in Suðurnes, Iceland

SPEAKERS:

Guðmundur Halldórsson, Research Coordinator, Soil Conservation Service of Iceland

Halldór Pálmar Halldórsson, Director, Suðurnes Research Centre, University of Iceland

Hrönn Ólína Jörundsdóttir, Project Manager, Matís

Sigrún Elsa Smáradóttir, Research Group Leader, Matís
CHAIR:

Helga Gunnlaugsdóttir, Research Group Leader, Matís

BREAKOUT SESSION Q: ARCTIC RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT AND INDIGENOUS RELIGIOUS RIGHTS

Organized by the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Rights in Constitutional and International Law at the University of Saskatchewan

SPEAKERS:

Michelle Biddulph, Juris Doctor Candidate and Researcher, University of Saskatchewan College of Law

Lorelle Binnion, Juris Doctor Candidate and Researcher, University of Saskatchewan College of Law
CHAIR:

Dwight Newman, Professor and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Rights in Constitutional and International Law, University of Saskatchewan College of Law

BREAKOUT SESSION R: SELLING THE CLIMATE CRISIS MESSAGE

SPEAKER:

Richard Greene, Author and Communication Coach

15:15–18:00PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 14: A CONVERSATION WITH ERIC SCHMIDT (15:15–16:15)

SPEAKER:

Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman, Google
CHAIR:

Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Alaska Dispatch

PLENARY SESSION 15: ARCTIC LESSONS FOR THE HIMALAYAN/THIRD POLE REGION (16:15–18:00)

SPEAKERS:

Yao Tandong, Director, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Larry Brilliant, President, Skoll Global Threats Fund

Kuupik Kleist, Member, Parliament of Greenland

David James Molden, Director General, International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD)
CHAIR:

Arjun Gupta, Founder and Managing Partner, TeleSoft Partners

MONDAY, OCTOBER 14

07:30–08:30 COFFEE SOCIAL

Hosted by EFLA Consulting Engineers08:30–10:50PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 16: THE FUTURE OF ARCTIC COOPERATION (08:30–09:50)

SPEAKERS:

Gunnar Bragi Sveinsson, Minister for Foreign Affairs, Iceland

Michel Rocard, Former Prime Minister of France and Special Envoy of President François Hollande

Kuupik Kleist, Member, Parliament of Greenland

Aqqaluk Lynge, Chair, Inuit Circumpolar Council
CHAIR:

Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Alaska Dispatch

PLENARY SESSION 17: THE FUTURE OF ARCTIC TOURISM (09:50–10:50)

SPEAKERS:

Gao Jie, General Manager, CTS Shanghai Private Overseas Affairs Co. Ltd.

Alain A. Grenier, Professor, Urban Studies and Tourism, Université du Québec à Montréal
CHAIR:

Sven-Olof Lindblad, President and Founder, Lindblad Expeditions

10:50–11:05COFFEE BREAK11:05–13:00PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 18: POLAR LAW: THE RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES (11:05–12:05)

SPEAKERS:

Edward Itta, Commissioner, U.S. Arctic Research Commission

Alexey Tsykarev, Member, Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, United Nations Human Rights Council
CHAIR:

Gudmundur Alfredsson, Professor of International Law and Human Rights, University of Akureyri

PLENARY SESSION 19: THE POWER OF MAPS (12:05–12:40)

SPEAKER:

Jenifer Austin Foulkes, Manager, Ocean Program, Google (Mapping Demo)

PLENARY SESSION 20: THE ARCTIC AT YOUR FINGERTIPS: NEW INFORMATION SOLUTIONS (12:40–13:00)

SPEAKER:

Andrey Suleykov, Chief Executive Officer, Appreal

13:00–14:30BREAKOUT SESSIONS (WORKING LUNCHES)

Lunch will be provided

BREAKOUT SESSION A: ARCTIC SECURITY (CONTINUED)

Organized by the Northern Research Forum (NRF) and the UArctic-NRF Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security

Historical, Current and Future North Atlantic Security: Microstates, Small States, Middle Powers and Superpowers

SPEAKERS:

Rasmus Gjedssø Bertelsen, Assistant Professor, Aalborg University

Gustav Pétursson, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Iceland

Maria Ackrén, Associate Professor in Political Science, University of Greenland

Beinta í Jákupsstovu, Associate Professor of Social Science, University of the Faroe Islands

Michael Corgan, Professor, Department of International Relations, Boston University

Gunhild Hoogensen Gjørv, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Tromsø

BREAKOUT SESSION D: ARCTIC LESSONS FOR THE HIMALAYAN/THIRD POLE REGION (CONTINUED AS NEEDED)

Organized by the Climate Research Fund, the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) and the Skoll Global Threats Fund

BREAKOUT SESSION J: POLAR LAW (CONTINUED)

Organized by the Symposium on Polar Law

SPEAKERS:

Julia Jabour, Program Leader, Ocean and Antarctic Governance, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania

Jeffrey Smith, Ph.D. Candidate, Faculty of Law, McGill University
CHAIR:

Gunhild Hoogensen Gjørv, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Tromsø

BREAKOUT SESSION S: ALASKA ARCTIC POLICY COMMISSION REPORT

SPEAKERS:

Bob Herron, Representative, Alaska House of Representatives

Lesil McGuire, Senator, Alaska Senate

BREAKOUT SESSION T: ARCTIC TRANSPORTATION AND RESPONSE INFRASTRUCTURE: BUILDING HUMAN CAPACITY
Workforce Development, Training and Education for Maritime and Response Activities

Organized by the Institute of the North

SPEAKERS:

Captain David (Duke) Snider, Vice President, Nautical Institute

Lawson Brigham, Professor, Geography and Arctic Policy, University of Alaska Fairbanks

CHAIR:

Nils Andreassen, Executive Director, Institute of the North

BREAKOUT SESSION U: THE DYNAMIC NORTH: SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Organized by the School of Engineering and Natural Sciences at the University of Iceland
SPEAKERS:

Árný Erla Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Research Scientist, Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland

Þóra Ellen Þórhallsdóttir, Professor, Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Iceland

Snæbjörn Pálsson, Professor, Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Iceland

Gunnar Stefánsson, Professor, Faculty of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Iceland

Anna Karlsdóttir, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Iceland

Ármann Höskuldsson, Research Professor, Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland

Bryndís Brandsdóttir, Research Scientist, Science Institute, University of Iceland

Björn Karlsson, Associate Professor, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Iceland

CHAIR:

Ingibjörg Jónsdóttir, Associate Professor, Faculty of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland

BREAKOUT SESSION V: EMERGING TRENDS IN THE WEST-NORDIC ARCTIC: SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL-HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

Organized by the Centre for Arctic Policy Studies (CAPS) at the University of Iceland
SPEAKERS:

Guðni Th. Jóhannesson, Assistant Professor of History, University of Iceland

Sigríður Huld Blöndal, International Relations, University of Iceland

Kristinn Schram, Director and Postdoctoral Researcher, Centre for Arctic Policy Studies (CAPS), University of Iceland

Lára Jóhannsdóttir, Postdoctoral Researcher, School of Business, University of Iceland

Egill Þór Níelsson, Researcher, Polar Research Institute of China (PRIC)

Þórður Þórarinsson, Secretary-General, West Nordic Council Secretariat

Aðalheiður Guðmundsdóttir, Associate Professor of Folkloristics and Ethnology, University of Iceland
CHAIR:

Margrét Cela, Project Manager, Centre for Arctic Policy Studies (CAPS), University of Iceland, and Ph.D. Candidate, University of Lapland

BREAKOUT SESSION W: ARCGIS: A MAPPING PLATFORM FOR ARCTIC RESEARCH

Organized by Esri

SPEAKER:

Drew Stephens, Oceans Manager, Esri

BREAKOUT SESSION X: OIL, GAS AND MINING DEVELOPMENTS IN THE WESTERN (NON-RUSSIAN) ARCTIC

Organized by Tactical Marine Solutions Ltd.

CHAIR:

Dermot Loughnane, Chief Executive Officer, Tactical Marine Solutions Ltd.

BREAKOUT SESSION Y: COOPERATION BETWEEN CLUSTERS

Organized by the Icelandic Joint Committee on Arctic Affairs, the Icelandic Arctic Cooperation Network, the Icelandic-Arctic Chamber of Commerce and the Arctic Services

SPEAKER:

Hákon Gunnarsson, Chief Executive Officer, Gekon

Thorsteinn Gunnarsson, Head, Division of Evaluation and Analysis, Icelandic Centre for Research (RANNIS), and Council Member, International Arctic Science Committee (IASC)

Heiðar Már Guðjónsson, Chairman of the Board, Eykon Energy

Embla Eir Oddsdóttir, Director, Icelandic Arctic Cooperation Network

Thorvaldur Ludvik Sigurjonsson, Managing Director, Eyjafjordur Business Development Agency
CHAIR:

Pétur Reimarsson, Director of Policymaking and Communications, Confederation of Icelandic Employers

BREAKOUT SESSION Z: CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC

Organized by the University of Akureyri

SPEAKERS:

Thomas H. McGovern, Professor, City University of New York

Jón Haukur Ingimundarson, Associate Professor, University of Akureyri and Stefansson Arctic Institute

Kristinn P. Magnússon, Professor, University of Akureyri and Icelandic Institute of Natural History

Hreiðar Þór Valtýsson, Assistant Professor, University of Akureyri
CHAIR:

Guðrún Rósa Þórsteinsdóttir, Director, University of Akureyri Research Centre and Northern Research Forum Secretariat

BREAKOUT SESSION AA: ARCTIC FORUM FOUNDATION

Invitation-Only Meeting for Arctic Business Round Table Partners

BREAKOUT SESSION BB: MITIGATING RAPID CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE CRYOSPHERE: BLACK CARBON AND SHORT-LIVED POLLUTANTS

Organized by the International Cryosphere Climate Initiative (ICCI)

Preview of the Cryosphere and Development Report, to be released by the World Bank and the ICCI for the 19th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 19)

SPEAKERS:

Pam Pearson, Director, International Cryosphere Climate Initiative (ICCI)

Lars Nordberg, Senior Advisor, Atmospheric Brown Cloud Project, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

Speakers from the Arctic Council, ICIMOD and Others

13:00–14:30LUNCH

MUSICAL PERFORMER:

Paul D. Miller (DJ Spooky)

INTRODUCTION:

Ross A. Virginia, Director, Institute of Arctic Studies, Dartmouth College

Following the performance, Mr. Miller will sign copies of “The Book of Ice,” which explores the impact of climate change on Antarctica through the prism of digital media and contemporary music compositions14:30–16:15PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 21: THE REPUBLIC OF KOREA IN THE ARCTIC (14:30–15:15)

SPEAKERS:

Ahn Chong-Ghee, Deputy Minister for Economic Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Korea

Kim Jong-Deog, Research Fellow, Korea Maritime Institute

PLENARY SESSION 22: GREENLAND’S PERSPECTIVE ON THE ARCTIC (15:15–16:15)

SPEAKERS:

Klaus Georg Hansen, Head of Institute, University of Greenland

Tønnes Berthelsen, Deputy Manager, KNAPK (Association of Fishermen and Hunters in Greenland)

Johan Rasmussen, Royal Arctic Line

Naja Carina Steenholdt, Student, University of Greenland
CHAIR:

Kuupik Kleist, Member, Parliament of Greenland

16:15–17:00NETWORKING BREAK17:00–21:00FINAL BREAKOUT SESSIONS

BREAKOUT SESSION A: ARCTIC SECURITY (CONTINUED AS NEEDED)

Organized by the Northern Research Forum (NRF) and the UArctic-NRF Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security

BREAKOUT SESSION D: ARCTIC LESSONS FOR THE HIMALAYAN/THIRD POLE REGION (CONTINUED AS NEEDED)

Organized by the Climate Research Fund, the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) and the Skoll Global Threats Fund

BREAKOUT SESSION J: POLAR LAW (CONTINUED)

Organized by the Symposium on Polar Law
Environmental Law, Including Access to Justice and the Aarhus Convention

SPEAKERS:

Sébastien Duyck, Researcher, Northern Institute for Environmental and Minority Law, Arctic Centre, University of Lapland

Rachael Lorna Johnstone, Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Akureyri

Simon Marsden, Associate Professor, Flinders Law School, Flinders University
CHAIR:

Timo Koivurova, Research Professor and Director, Northern Institute for Environmental and Minority Law, Arctic Centre, University of Lapland

BREAKOUT SESSION U: THE DYNAMIC NORTH: SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (CONTINUED AS NEEDED)

Organized by the School of Engineering and Natural Sciences at the University of Iceland

BREAKOUT SESSION V: EMERGING TRENDS IN THE WEST-NORDIC ARCTIC: SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL-HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES (CONTINUED AS NEEDED)

Organized by the Centre for Arctic Policy Studies (CAPS) at the University of Iceland

BREAKOUT SESSION CC: ARCTIC CIRCLE: EVALUATION AND NEXT STEPS

Meeting of Representatives from Participating Organizations

BREAKOUT SESSION DD: ICE NAVIGATOR PROJECT: FINAL STEPS TO A GLOBAL STANDARD

Organized by the Nautical Institute
SPEAKER:

Captain David (Duke) Snider, Vice President, Nautical Institute

BREAKOUT SESSION EE: ALEUTIAN ISLANDS RISK ASSESSMENT: REDUCING HAZARDS AND CONSEQUENCES OF MARITIME TRANSPORTATION NEAR THE ARCTIC

Organized by Nuka Research and Planning Group
SPEAKER:

Sierra Fletcher, Senior Program Manager, Nuka Research and Planning Group

BREAKOUT SESSION FF: AN OPEN-SOURCE DECISION MODEL FOR STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR THE ARCTIC REGION

Organized by Reykjavík University
SPEAKERS:

Þórður Víkingur Friðgeirsson, Assistant Professor, School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavík University

Páll Jensson, Professor, School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavík University

þorgeir Pálsson, Professor, School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavík University

Hlynur Stefánsson, Assistant Professor, School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavík University

BREAKOUT SESSION GG: EDUCATIONAL AND SCIENTIFIC ARCTIC EXPEDITION OF THE FAR EASTERN FLOATING UNIVERSITY

Organized by Maritime State University Named After Admiral G.I. Nevelskoi

PARTICIPANTS:

Pavel Salyuk, Maritime State University and V.I. Il’ichev Pacific Oceanological Institute, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences

Denis Burov, Maritime State University

Ekaterina Sokolova, Maritime State University and Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences

19:00MEETING OF ARCTIC CIRCLE HONORARY AND ADVISORY BOARDS

Outcomes and Next Steps

PROGRAM DRAFT | CONFIRMED SESSIONS AND SPEAKERS

(Last updated on October 7, 2013.)

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11

18:00–20:00 WELCOME RECEPTION
Reykjavík Art Museum

Hosted by Arctia Shipping

Music by Guitar Islancio

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12

07:30–08:30 COFFEE SOCIAL

Hosted by Olgoonik Corp. and Pt Capital08:30–10:10PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 1: OPENING SESSION (08:30–10:10)

SPEAKERS:

Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, President, Iceland

Aleqa Hammond, Premier, Greenland

Kaj Leo Holm Johannesen, Prime Minister, Faroe Islands

Lisa Murkowski, U.S. Senator

Patrick Borbey, Chair, Senior Arctic Officials, Arctic Council, and President, Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor)

Anton Vasiliev, Ambassador at Large, Arctic Cooperation, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Russia
CHAIR:

Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Alaska Dispatch
VIDEO MESSAGES:

Hillary Rodham Clinton, Former Secretary of State, United States

Ban Ki-Moon, Secretary-General, United Nations

HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco

10:10–10:25COFFEE BREAK

Hosted by Esri

10:25–13:10PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 2: CLIMATE CHANGE: A PLAN FOR ACTION? (10:25–11:45)

VIDEO MESSAGE:

Al Gore, Former Vice President, United States, and Nobel Laureate
SPEAKERS:

Enric Sala, Explorer-in-Residence, National Geographic Society

Tom Harkin, U.S. Senator

Mark Halle, Vice President, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)

Sergio C. Trindade, President, SE2T International, and Nobel Laureate

Johan van de Gronden, Chief Executive Officer, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Netherlands

Ghislaine Maxwell, Founder, The TerraMar Project
CHAIR:

Olav Orheim, Member, Scientific and Technical Committee, Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation

PLENARY SESSION 3: SHORT FILM: “LAST HOURS” (11:45–11:55)

“Last Hours” is the first in a series of short films from Tree Media Foundation that explore the perils of climate change and the solutions to avert climate disaster.

PLENARY SESSION 4: ARCTIC ICE MELT: GLOBAL WEATHER EVENTS (11:55–13:10)

VIDEO MESSAGE:

Rajendra K. Pachauri, Chair, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and Nobel Laureate
SPEAKERS:

Li Yuansheng, Deputy Director, Polar Research Institute of China (PRIC)

Karin Lochte, Chair, Alfred Wegener Institute

Minik Rosing, Professor, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen

Helgi Björnsson, Research Professor, Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland

Ingibjörg Jónsdóttir, Associate Professor, Faculty of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland
CHAIR:

Alexander Borodin, MHC (Services) Ltd.
VIDEO MESSAGE:

James Balog, Photographer, National Geographic (“Chasing Ice”)

13:10–13:40LUNCH13:40–16:10PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 5: SINGAPORE IN THE ARCTIC (13:40–14:15)

SPEAKER:

Sam Tan Chin Siong, Senior Parliamentary Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Singapore

PLENARY SESSION 6: ARCTIC GEOPOLITICS (14:15–14:45)

SPEAKER:

Strobe Talbott, President, Brookings Institution

PLENARY SESSION 7: ARCTIC ENERGY COOPERATION (14:45–16:00)

Arctic Energy Summit Report

SPEAKER:

Nils Andreassen, Executive Director, Institute of the North
Oil and Gas: Problems and Possibilities

SPEAKERS:

Heiðar Már Guðjónsson, Chairman of the Board, Eykon Energy

Rúni M. Hansen, Vice President, Arctic Unit, Statoil

Anthony Hodge, President, International Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM)

Jörg Ranau, Deputy Director-General for Economic Affairs, Federal Foreign Office, Germany

Bae Sung-Ho, Senior Researcher, Global Energy Cooperation Center, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Korea
CHAIR:

Charles K. Ebinger, Director, Energy Security Initiative, Brookings Institution

PLENARY SESSION 8: LAUNCH OF ARCTIC YEARBOOK 2013: THE ARCTIC OF REGIONS VS. THE GLOBALIZED ARCTIC (16:00–16:10)

SPEAKER:

Lassi Heininen, Professor, University of Lapland, and Editor, Arctic Yearbook

Heather Exner-Pirot, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Saskatchewan, and Co-Managing Editor, Arctic Yearbook

16:10–19:00BREAKOUT SESSIONSThese and the other breakout sessions in this agenda are organized by the participating organizations.

BREAKOUT SESSION A: ARCTIC SECURITY

Organized by the Northern Research Forum (NRF) and the UArctic-NRF Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security
Changes in a State of Security in the Arctic

SPEAKERS:

Lassi Heininen, Professor, University of Lapland

Heather Exner-Pirot, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Saskatchewan

Michal Luszczuk, Faculty Member, Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce

Steven Lamy, Professor of International Relations and Vice Dean for Academic Programs, Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, University of Southern California
The Nexus of Extractive Industries, the Environment and Climate Change: An Arctic (Security) Paradox

SPEAKERS:

Margrét Cela, Project Manager, Centre for Arctic Policy Studies (CAPS), University of Iceland, and Ph.D. Candidate, University of Lapland

Sóley Kaldal, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Iceland

Baozhi Cheng, Research Fellow, Shanghai Institutes for International Studies (SIIS)

Aki Tonami, Researcher, Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS), University of Copenhagen

Matthias Finger, Professor, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)

BREAKOUT SESSION B: BUSINESS COOPERATION: INDUSTRY LEADERSHIP AND COLLABORATION FOR RESPONSIBLE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE ARCTIC

Organized by the World Ocean Council
SPEAKERS:

Sarah Barton, Chief Strategy Officer, Arctic Fibre Inc. and Quintillion Networks

Robert J. Blaauw, Senior Advisor, Global Arctic Theme, Shell International Exploration and Production B.V.

Sven-Olof Lindblad, President and Founder, Lindblad Expeditions

Gylfi Sigfússon, President and Chief Executive Officer, Eimskip

Mikael Thinghuus, Chief Executive Officer, Royal Greenland A/S
CHAIR:

Paul Holthus, Chief Executive Officer, World Ocean Council
Arctic Industry Panel: Industry Perspectives on Responsible Economic Development in the Arctic and the Value of Business Cooperation

MODERATOR:

Hans Christian Krarup, Denmark Country Director, Golder Associates

Panel Discussion: Further Developing an Arctic Business Leadership Council and Multi-Industry Collaboration and Leadership on Responsible Business Development in the Arctic Region

MODERATOR:

Tim Lunel, Support and Development Director, International Tankers Owners Pollution Federation (ITOPF)

Open Forum Discussion with the Arctic Business Community: Advancing Business Cooperation and Developing the Structure and Process for Fostering Cooperation

MODERATOR:

Theodore L. Rockwell, Alaska Regional Coordinator, Business Development, Energy and Environment, Battelle Memorial Institute

BREAKOUT SESSION C: HUNTERS AND FISHERMEN: FIRST-HAND OBSERVATIONS AND PERSPECTIVES

SPEAKERS:

Tønnes Berthelsen, Deputy Manager, KNAPK (Association of Fishermen and Hunters in Greenland)

Raychelle Daniel, Senior Associate, U.S. Arctic Program, Pew Environment Group

Anders J. H. Eira, Economist and Reindeer Herder

Steinar Pedersen, Associate Professor, Sámi University College, and Subsistence Salmon Fisherman

BREAKOUT SESSION D: ARCTIC LESSONS FOR THE HIMALAYAN/THIRD POLE REGION

Organized by the Climate Research Fund, the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) and the Skoll Global Threats Fund

PARTICIPANTS:

Frederik Paulsen, Founder, Paulsen Editions

Yao Tandong, Director, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Mihir Shah, Member, Planning Commission, Government of India

David James Molden, Director General, International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD)

Pema Gyamtsho, Member, Parliament of Bhutan

Linxiu Zhang, Professor and Deputy Director, Centre for Chinese Agricultural Policy, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Anil Kulkarni, Scientist, Indian Institute of Science

Eklabya Sharma, Director, Programme Operations, International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD)

Anil Gupta, Director, Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology

Ghulam Rasul, Chief Meteorologist, Pakistan Meteorological Department

Ravi Singh, Secretary-General and Chief Executive Officer, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) India

Arunabha Ghosh, Chief Executive Officer, Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW)

Mahmood Akhtar Cheema, Country Representative, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Pakistan

Ravindra Kumar Shakya, Vice Chairman, National Planning Commission of Nepal

Napa Bikram Kishore Tripura, Secretary, Ministry of Chittagong Hill Tracts Affairs of Bangladesh

Atiq Rahman, Executive Director, Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies

Qazi Kholiquzzaman Ahmad, Chairman, Palli Karma-Sahayak Foundation

Karma Toeb, Glaciologist, Department of Geology and Mines, Bhutan

Ganesh Pangare, Head, Water Programme, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Thailand

BREAKOUT SESSION E: UNIVERSITY OF THE ARCTIC: BOARD OF GOVERNORS MEETING

Closed Meeting (By Invitation Only)
UArctic is a cooperative network of more than 150 universities, colleges and other organizations dedicated to education, research and the promotion of indigenous and local capacities and sustainable development in the circumpolar North.

BREAKOUT SESSION F: THE SCIENCE OF ICE: GLOBAL RESEARCH COOPERATION

Organized by the Icelandic Centre for Research (RANNIS) and the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC)

Participants from RANNIS, the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC), the Alfred Wegener Institute, the Polar Research Institute of China, the U.S. Arctic Research Commission, Le Cercle Polaire, the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs (COMNAP) and other Arctic organizations and scientific institutions

SPEAKERS:

Edward Itta, Commissioner, U.S. Arctic Research Commission

Li Yuansheng, Deputy Director, Polar Research Institute of China (PRIC)

Karin Lochte, Chair, Alfred Wegener Institute

Laurent Mayet, Director, Le Cercle Polaire, and Special Advisor to Michel Rocard

Olav Orheim, Member, Scientific and Technical Committee, Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation
CHAIR:

Thorsteinn Gunnarsson, Head, Division of Evaluation and Analysis, Icelandic Centre for Research (RANNIS), and Council Member, International Arctic Science Committee (IASC)
RAPPORTEUR:

Amy L. Wiita, President and Principal Research Scientist, Cinza Research LLC

BREAKOUT SESSION G: ICE2SEA CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE INTERGOVERNMENTAL PANEL ON CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT: UNDERSTANDING ICE LOSS AND SEA-LEVEL RISE

Organized by the British Antarctic Survey
SPEAKERS:

David Vaughan, Science Leader, British Antarctic Survey

Guðfinna Aðalgeirsdóttir, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland

BREAKOUT SESSION H: BUILDING CAPACITY IN ABORIGINAL COMMUNITIES: RELEVANT AND ACCESSIBLE EDUCATION IN THE NORTH

Organized by Yukon College
SPEAKERS:

Tosh Southwick, Director, First Nation Initiatives, Yukon College

Karen Barnes, President, Yukon College

BREAKOUT SESSION I: FILM SCREENING: “VANISHING POINT”

Organized by Meltwater Media

This documentary tells the story of two Inuit communities—one on Canada’s Baffin Island, the other in Northwest Greenland—and explores the consequences of rapid social and environmental change. The screening will be followed by a question-and-answer session with the director.

19:00OPEN RECEPTION AT HARPA19:30–22:30RECEPTION AND DINNER (BY INVITATION)

Hosted by Guggenheim Partners

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13

07:30–08:30 COFFEE SOCIALHosted by Arion Bank
08:30–10:15 PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 9: NORTHERN SEA ROUTES: A NEW ERA IN GLOBAL SHIPPING (08:30–09:45)

SPEAKERS:

Yunpeng Li, President, China Ocean Shipping (Group) Co. (COSCO Group)

Dmitry Pourim, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Sovfracht

Gylfi Sigfússon, President and Chief Executive Officer, Eimskip

Nils Andersen, Group Chief Executive Officer, A.P. Moller-Maersk

Ásbjörn Gíslason, Chief Executive Officer, Samskip
CHAIR:

Felix H. Tschudi, Chairman and Owner, Tschudi Group
The Russian Legislative Framework for the Northern Sea Route

SPEAKERS:

Mikhail Slipenchuk, Deputy, State Duma, Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation

PLENARY SESSION 10: ARCTIC BUSINESS COOPERATION: INVESTOR OUTLOOK (09:45–10:15)

SPEAKER:

Scott Minerd, Global Chief Investment Officer, Guggenheim Partners

10:15–10:30 BREAK
10:30–13:00 PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 11: LAW OF THE SEA (10:30–11:30)

Organized by the Symposium on Polar Law
SPEAKERS:

Erik Franckx, Professor of International Law, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)

Tomas H. Heidar, Legal Adviser, Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Iceland

Bjarni Már Magnússon, Specialist, School of Law, Reykjavík University

Larry Mayer, Professor of Earth Science and Ocean Engineering, University of New Hampshire

Philip Steinberg, Professor of Political Geography, Durham University
CHAIR:

Bosse Hedberg, Ambassador of Sweden to Iceland

PLENARY SESSION 12: THE ALASKAN STATE OF THE ARCTIC (11:30–12:15)

Underwritten by Ukpea?vik Iñupiat Corp.

SPEAKERS:

Lisa Murkowski, U.S. Senator

Mead Treadwell, Lieutenant Governor, State of Alaska

Reggie Joule, Mayor, Northwest Arctic Borough, Alaska
CHAIR:

Scott Borgerson, Chief Executive Officer, CargoMetrics Inc.
VIDEO MESSAGE:

Mark Begich, U.S. Senator

PLENARY SESSION 13: RUSSIA AND THE ARCTIC (12:15–13:00)

SPEAKER:

Artur Chilingarov, Explorer and Special Envoy of President Vladimir Putin to the Arctic
CHAIR:

Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, President, Iceland

13:00–13:30 LUNCH
13:30–15:00 BREAKOUT SESSIONS (WORKING LUNCHES)Lunch will be provided

BREAKOUT SESSION A: ARCTIC SECURITY (CONTINUED)

Organized by the Northern Research Forum (NRF) and the UArctic-NRF Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security
Future History of (State) Sovereignty and (National) Security in the Globalized Arctic

SPEAKERS:

Sandra Maria Rodrigues Balão, Assistant Professor, Technical University of Lisbon

Andreas Raspotnik, Research Fellow, University of Cologne

Alexander Sergunin, Professor, School of International Relations, St. Petersburg State University

Dorothée Cambou, Ph.D. Candidate, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)

Heather N. Nicol, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, Trent University

BREAKOUT SESSION D: ARCTIC LESSONS FOR THE HIMALAYAN/THIRD POLE REGION (CONTINUED AS NEEDED)

Organized by the Climate Research Fund, the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) and the Skoll Global Threats Fund

BREAKOUT SESSION J: POLAR LAW

Organized by the Symposium on Polar Law
Arctic Resource Development: Arctic Energy Meets Polar Law

SPEAKERS:

Mikhail Babenko, Oil & Gas Officer, Global Arctic Program, World Wildlife Fund (WWF)

Niels Einarsson, Director, Stefansson Arctic Institute

Theodore L. Rockwell, Alaska Regional Coordinator, Business Development, Energy and Environment, Battelle Memorial Institute

Larry Mayer, Professor of Earth Science and Ocean Engineering, University of New Hampshire

Maaike Knol, Researcher, Norwegian College of Fishery Science, Faculty of Biosciences, Fisheries and Economics, University of Tromsø
CHAIR:

Betsy Baker, Associate Professor and Senior Fellow for Oceans and Energy, Institute for Energy and the Environment, Vermont Law School

BREAKOUT SESSION K: ARCTIC INFRASTRUCTURE AND INVESTMENT: THE VIEW FROM ALASKA

Organized by the Arctic Imperative Summit, Olgoonik Corp. and Pt Capital

Investment in the Arctic: A Careful Balance

SPEAKERS:

Hugh Patkotak Sr., Chairman of the Board of Directors, Olgoonik Corp.

Mary Jane Lang, Chief Executive Officer, Olgoonik Corp.

Kevin Hand, President, Commercial Division, Olgoonik Corp.

James Pass, Managing Director, Guggenheim Partners

Hugh Short, Chief Executive Officer, Pt Capital

CHAIR:

Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Alaska Dispatch
Ports and Infrastructure

SPEAKERS:

Gail R. Schubert, President and Chief Executive Officer, Bering Straits Native Corp.

Mark L. Smith, Chief Executive Officer, Vitus Energy, and Former Mayor, Aleknagik, Alaska

Bob Herron, Representative, Alaska House of Representatives

CHAIR:

Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Alaska Dispatch

BREAKOUT SESSION L: THE ARCTIC INSTITUTE: INTERDISCIPLINARY ARCTIC CLIMATE AND ECOSYSTEM CHANGE

SPEAKERS:

Cecilia Bitz, Professor, Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington

Michael Macrander, Science Lead, Shell Alaska

Mark Myers, Vice Chancellor for Research, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Eric Steig, Professor, Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington
CHAIR:

Fran Ulmer, Chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission

BREAKOUT SESSION M: FINNAFJORD HARBOR: A NEW HUB IN THE CENTRAL NORTH ATLANTIC

SPEAKERS:

Hafsteinn Helgason, Director of Business Development, EFLA Consulting Engineers

Robert Howe, Managing Director, Bremenports

BREAKOUT SESSION N: HEALTH AND WELL-BEING IN THE ARCTIC

Organized by the University of Akureyri

SPEAKERS:

Elín Ebba Ásmundsdóttir, Associate Professor, University of Akureyri

Árún K. Sigurðardóttir, Professor, University of Akureyri

Kristín Þórarinsdóttir, Lecturer, University of Akureyri

Kristín Guðmundsdóttir, Assistant Professor, University of Akureyri
CHAIR:

Kristinn P. Magnússon, Professor, University of Akureyri and Icelandic Institute of Natural History

BREAKOUT SESSION O: ARCTIC BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

Organized by Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF), the biodiversity working group of the Arctic Council

Presentation, film screening and question-and-answer period

SPEAKER:

Tom Barry, Executive Secretary, Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF)

Lawrence Hislop, Head, Polar Division, GRID-Arendal, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

BREAKOUT SESSION P: THE EMERGING RISKS AND THE ARCTIC BIOECONOMY

Organized by Matís and the University of Iceland’s Research Centre in Suðurnes, Iceland

SPEAKERS:

Guðmundur Halldórsson, Research Coordinator, Soil Conservation Service of Iceland

Halldór Pálmar Halldórsson, Director, Suðurnes Research Centre, University of Iceland

Hrönn Ólína Jörundsdóttir, Project Manager, Matís

Sigrún Elsa Smáradóttir, Research Group Leader, Matís
CHAIR:

Helga Gunnlaugsdóttir, Research Group Leader, Matís

BREAKOUT SESSION Q: ARCTIC RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT AND INDIGENOUS RELIGIOUS RIGHTS

Organized by the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Rights in Constitutional and International Law at the University of Saskatchewan

SPEAKERS:

Michelle Biddulph, Juris Doctor Candidate and Researcher, University of Saskatchewan College of Law

Lorelle Binnion, Juris Doctor Candidate and Researcher, University of Saskatchewan College of Law
CHAIR:

Dwight Newman, Professor and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Rights in Constitutional and International Law, University of Saskatchewan College of Law

BREAKOUT SESSION R: SELLING THE CLIMATE CRISIS MESSAGE

SPEAKER:

Richard Greene, Author and Communication Coach

15:15–18:00 PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 14: A CONVERSATION WITH ERIC SCHMIDT (15:15–16:15)

SPEAKER:

Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman, Google
CHAIR:

Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Alaska Dispatch

PLENARY SESSION 15: ARCTIC LESSONS FOR THE HIMALAYAN/THIRD POLE REGION (16:15–18:00)

SPEAKERS:

Yao Tandong, Director, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Larry Brilliant, President, Skoll Global Threats Fund

Kuupik Kleist, Member, Parliament of Greenland

David James Molden, Director General, International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD)
CHAIR:

Arjun Gupta, Founder and Managing Partner, TeleSoft Partners

MONDAY, OCTOBER 14

07:30–08:30 COFFEE SOCIALHosted by EFLA Consulting Engineers
08:30–10:50 PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 16: THE FUTURE OF ARCTIC COOPERATION (08:30–09:50)

SPEAKERS:

Gunnar Bragi Sveinsson, Minister for Foreign Affairs, Iceland

Michel Rocard, Former Prime Minister of France and Special Envoy of President François Hollande

Kuupik Kleist, Member, Parliament of Greenland

Aqqaluk Lynge, Chair, Inuit Circumpolar Council
CHAIR:

Alice Rogoff, Publisher, Alaska Dispatch

PLENARY SESSION 17: THE FUTURE OF ARCTIC TOURISM (09:50–10:50)

SPEAKERS:

Gao Jie, General Manager, CTS Shanghai Private Overseas Affairs Co. Ltd.

Alain A. Grenier, Professor, Urban Studies and Tourism, Université du Québec à Montréal
CHAIR:

Sven-Olof Lindblad, President and Founder, Lindblad Expeditions

10:50–11:05 COFFEE BREAK
11:05–13:00 PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 18: POLAR LAW: THE RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES (11:05–12:05)

SPEAKERS:

Edward Itta, Commissioner, U.S. Arctic Research Commission

Alexey Tsykarev, Member, Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, United Nations Human Rights Council
CHAIR:

Gudmundur Alfredsson, Professor of International Law and Human Rights, University of Akureyri

PLENARY SESSION 19: THE POWER OF MAPS (12:05–12:40)

SPEAKER:

Jenifer Austin Foulkes, Manager, Ocean Program, Google (Mapping Demo)

PLENARY SESSION 20: THE ARCTIC AT YOUR FINGERTIPS: NEW INFORMATION SOLUTIONS (12:40–13:00)

SPEAKER:

Andrey Suleykov, Chief Executive Officer, Appreal

13:00–14:30 BREAKOUT SESSIONS (WORKING LUNCHES)Lunch will be provided

BREAKOUT SESSION A: ARCTIC SECURITY (CONTINUED)

Organized by the Northern Research Forum (NRF) and the UArctic-NRF Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security

Historical, Current and Future North Atlantic Security: Microstates, Small States, Middle Powers and Superpowers

SPEAKERS:

Rasmus Gjedssø Bertelsen, Assistant Professor, Aalborg University

Gustav Pétursson, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Iceland

Maria Ackrén, Associate Professor in Political Science, University of Greenland

Beinta í Jákupsstovu, Associate Professor of Social Science, University of the Faroe Islands

Michael Corgan, Professor, Department of International Relations, Boston University

Gunhild Hoogensen Gjørv, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Tromsø

BREAKOUT SESSION D: ARCTIC LESSONS FOR THE HIMALAYAN/THIRD POLE REGION (CONTINUED AS NEEDED)

Organized by the Climate Research Fund, the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) and the Skoll Global Threats Fund

BREAKOUT SESSION J: POLAR LAW (CONTINUED)

Organized by the Symposium on Polar Law

SPEAKERS:

Julia Jabour, Program Leader, Ocean and Antarctic Governance, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania

Jeffrey Smith, Ph.D. Candidate, Faculty of Law, McGill University
CHAIR:

Gunhild Hoogensen Gjørv, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Tromsø

BREAKOUT SESSION S: ALASKA ARCTIC POLICY COMMISSION REPORT

SPEAKERS:

Bob Herron, Representative, Alaska House of Representatives

Lesil McGuire, Senator, Alaska Senate

BREAKOUT SESSION T: ARCTIC TRANSPORTATION AND RESPONSE INFRASTRUCTURE: BUILDING HUMAN CAPACITY
Workforce Development, Training and Education for Maritime and Response Activities

Organized by the Institute of the North

SPEAKERS:

Captain David (Duke) Snider, Vice President, Nautical Institute

Lawson Brigham, Professor, Geography and Arctic Policy, University of Alaska Fairbanks

CHAIR:

Nils Andreassen, Executive Director, Institute of the North

BREAKOUT SESSION U: THE DYNAMIC NORTH: SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Organized by the School of Engineering and Natural Sciences at the University of Iceland
SPEAKERS:

Árný Erla Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Research Scientist, Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland

Þóra Ellen Þórhallsdóttir, Professor, Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Iceland

Snæbjörn Pálsson, Professor, Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Iceland

Gunnar Stefánsson, Professor, Faculty of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Iceland

Anna Karlsdóttir, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Iceland

Ármann Höskuldsson, Research Professor, Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland

Bryndís Brandsdóttir, Research Scientist, Science Institute, University of Iceland

Björn Karlsson, Associate Professor, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Iceland

CHAIR:

Ingibjörg Jónsdóttir, Associate Professor, Faculty of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland

BREAKOUT SESSION V: EMERGING TRENDS IN THE WEST-NORDIC ARCTIC: SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL-HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

Organized by the Centre for Arctic Policy Studies (CAPS) at the University of Iceland
SPEAKERS:

Guðni Th. Jóhannesson, Assistant Professor of History, University of Iceland

Sigríður Huld Blöndal, International Relations, University of Iceland

Kristinn Schram, Director and Postdoctoral Researcher, Centre for Arctic Policy Studies (CAPS), University of Iceland

Lára Jóhannsdóttir, Postdoctoral Researcher, School of Business, University of Iceland

Egill Þór Níelsson, Researcher, Polar Research Institute of China (PRIC)

Þórður Þórarinsson, Secretary-General, West Nordic Council Secretariat

Aðalheiður Guðmundsdóttir, Associate Professor of Folkloristics and Ethnology, University of Iceland
CHAIR:

Margrét Cela, Project Manager, Centre for Arctic Policy Studies (CAPS), University of Iceland, and Ph.D. Candidate, University of Lapland

BREAKOUT SESSION W: ARCGIS: A MAPPING PLATFORM FOR ARCTIC RESEARCH

Organized by Esri

SPEAKER:

Drew Stephens, Oceans Manager, Esri

BREAKOUT SESSION X: OIL, GAS AND MINING DEVELOPMENTS IN THE WESTERN (NON-RUSSIAN) ARCTIC

Organized by Tactical Marine Solutions Ltd.

CHAIR:

Dermot Loughnane, Chief Executive Officer, Tactical Marine Solutions Ltd.

BREAKOUT SESSION Y: COOPERATION BETWEEN CLUSTERS

Organized by the Icelandic Joint Committee on Arctic Affairs, the Icelandic Arctic Cooperation Network, the Icelandic-Arctic Chamber of Commerce and the Arctic Services

SPEAKER:

Hákon Gunnarsson, Chief Executive Officer, Gekon

Thorsteinn Gunnarsson, Head, Division of Evaluation and Analysis, Icelandic Centre for Research (RANNIS), and Council Member, International Arctic Science Committee (IASC)

Heiðar Már Guðjónsson, Chairman of the Board, Eykon Energy

Embla Eir Oddsdóttir, Director, Icelandic Arctic Cooperation Network

Thorvaldur Ludvik Sigurjonsson, Managing Director, Eyjafjordur Business Development Agency
CHAIR:

Pétur Reimarsson, Director of Policymaking and Communications, Confederation of Icelandic Employers

BREAKOUT SESSION Z: CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC

Organized by the University of Akureyri

SPEAKERS:

Thomas H. McGovern, Professor, City University of New York

Jón Haukur Ingimundarson, Associate Professor, University of Akureyri and Stefansson Arctic Institute

Kristinn P. Magnússon, Professor, University of Akureyri and Icelandic Institute of Natural History

Hreiðar Þór Valtýsson, Assistant Professor, University of Akureyri
CHAIR:

Guðrún Rósa Þórsteinsdóttir, Director, University of Akureyri Research Centre and Northern Research Forum Secretariat

BREAKOUT SESSION AA: ARCTIC FORUM FOUNDATION

Invitation-Only Meeting for Arctic Business Round Table Partners

BREAKOUT SESSION BB: MITIGATING RAPID CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE CRYOSPHERE: BLACK CARBON AND SHORT-LIVED POLLUTANTS

Organized by the International Cryosphere Climate Initiative (ICCI)

Preview of the Cryosphere and Development Report, to be released by the World Bank and the ICCI for the 19th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 19)

SPEAKERS:

Pam Pearson, Director, International Cryosphere Climate Initiative (ICCI)

Lars Nordberg, Senior Advisor, Atmospheric Brown Cloud Project, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

Speakers from the Arctic Council, ICIMOD and Others

13:00–14:30 LUNCHMUSICAL PERFORMER:Paul D. Miller (DJ Spooky)

INTRODUCTION:

Ross A. Virginia, Director, Institute of Arctic Studies, Dartmouth College

Following the performance, Mr. Miller will sign copies of “The Book of Ice,” which explores the impact of climate change on Antarctica through the prism of digital media and contemporary music compositions

14:30–16:15 PLENARY SESSIONS

PLENARY SESSION 21: THE REPUBLIC OF KOREA IN THE ARCTIC (14:30–15:15)

SPEAKERS:

Ahn Chong-Ghee, Deputy Minister for Economic Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Korea

Kim Jong-Deog, Research Fellow, Korea Maritime Institute

PLENARY SESSION 22: GREENLAND’S PERSPECTIVE ON THE ARCTIC (15:15–16:15)

SPEAKERS:

Klaus Georg Hansen, Head of Institute, University of Greenland

Tønnes Berthelsen, Deputy Manager, KNAPK (Association of Fishermen and Hunters in Greenland)

Johan Rasmussen, Royal Arctic Line

Naja Carina Steenholdt, Student, University of Greenland
CHAIR:

Kuupik Kleist, Member, Parliament of Greenland

16:15–17:00 NETWORKING BREAK
17:00–21:00 FINAL BREAKOUT SESSIONS

BREAKOUT SESSION A: ARCTIC SECURITY (CONTINUED AS NEEDED)

Organized by the Northern Research Forum (NRF) and the UArctic-NRF Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security

BREAKOUT SESSION D: ARCTIC LESSONS FOR THE HIMALAYAN/THIRD POLE REGION (CONTINUED AS NEEDED)

Organized by the Climate Research Fund, the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) and the Skoll Global Threats Fund

BREAKOUT SESSION J: POLAR LAW (CONTINUED)

Organized by the Symposium on Polar Law
Environmental Law, Including Access to Justice and the Aarhus Convention

SPEAKERS:

Sébastien Duyck, Researcher, Northern Institute for Environmental and Minority Law, Arctic Centre, University of Lapland

Rachael Lorna Johnstone, Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Akureyri

Simon Marsden, Associate Professor, Flinders Law School, Flinders University
CHAIR:

Timo Koivurova, Research Professor and Director, Northern Institute for Environmental and Minority Law, Arctic Centre, University of Lapland

BREAKOUT SESSION U: THE DYNAMIC NORTH: SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (CONTINUED AS NEEDED)

Organized by the School of Engineering and Natural Sciences at the University of Iceland

BREAKOUT SESSION V: EMERGING TRENDS IN THE WEST-NORDIC ARCTIC: SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL-HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES (CONTINUED AS NEEDED)

Organized by the Centre for Arctic Policy Studies (CAPS) at the University of Iceland

BREAKOUT SESSION CC: ARCTIC CIRCLE: EVALUATION AND NEXT STEPS

Meeting of Representatives from Participating Organizations

BREAKOUT SESSION DD: ICE NAVIGATOR PROJECT: FINAL STEPS TO A GLOBAL STANDARD

Organized by the Nautical Institute
SPEAKER:

Captain David (Duke) Snider, Vice President, Nautical Institute

BREAKOUT SESSION EE: ALEUTIAN ISLANDS RISK ASSESSMENT: REDUCING HAZARDS AND CONSEQUENCES OF MARITIME TRANSPORTATION NEAR THE ARCTIC

Organized by Nuka Research and Planning Group
SPEAKER:

Sierra Fletcher, Senior Program Manager, Nuka Research and Planning Group

BREAKOUT SESSION FF: AN OPEN-SOURCE DECISION MODEL FOR STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR THE ARCTIC REGION

Organized by Reykjavík University
SPEAKERS:

Þórður Víkingur Friðgeirsson, Assistant Professor, School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavík University

Páll Jensson, Professor, School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavík University

þorgeir Pálsson, Professor, School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavík University

Hlynur Stefánsson, Assistant Professor, School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavík University

BREAKOUT SESSION GG: EDUCATIONAL AND SCIENTIFIC ARCTIC EXPEDITION OF THE FAR EASTERN FLOATING UNIVERSITY

Organized by Maritime State University Named After Admiral G.I. Nevelskoi

PARTICIPANTS:

Pavel Salyuk, Maritime State University and V.I. Il’ichev Pacific Oceanological Institute, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences

Denis Burov, Maritime State University

Ekaterina Sokolova, Maritime State University and Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences

19:00 MEETING OF ARCTIC CIRCLE HONORARY AND ADVISORY BOARDSOutcomes and Next Steps

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on July 25th, 2013
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

UAE- Norwegian woman who claimed rape pardoned.
MENAFN – Khaleej Times – 23/07/2013

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(Khaleej Times) A Norwegian woman, who was jailed for having illicit sex and for giving a false report to the authorities about being raped, has been granted pardon, a prosecution source has confirmed.

“Her case has reached authorities beyond the Public Prosecution including the UAE Ministry of Foreign Affairs,” the source told Khaleej Times.

Marte Deborah Dalelv, in a statement to a Press agency, said that she was given back her passport by the Attorney-General’s Office and the case was dropped against her which made her free to leave the UAE.

The 24-year old woman, who works as an interior design executive, had been sentenced by the Court of Misdemeanours to 16 months in jail, followed by deportation, for falsely reporting a rape, having sex out-of-wedlock and consuming alcohol.

Her lawyer has already appealed the sentencing and a hearing was scheduled for September 5. She told police and prosecutors that her Sudanese boss raped her in his hotel room in the Safa area in Bur Dubai in March, taking advantage that she was under the influence of alcohol. The man was sentenced to 13 months in jail and deportation. She had been on a business trip with him when the incident happened.

Marte’s case has created media frenzy in the west after she told her story to the Press recounting her ordeal and shock over being held in custody for reporting a rape. She claimed that during the interrogation, she changed her testimony claiming to the investigators that she had consensual sex in a desperate bid to get a reduced sentence.

In Oslo, Norwegian Foreign Minister Espen Barth Eide said that Dalelv was being allowed to leave the UAE.

“Marte (Dalelv) is released! Thanks to everyone who signed up to help,” the minister wrote on Twitter, adding that she would be returning home soon.

A spokeswoman from the ministry told AFP that Dalelv was not deported.

“She hasn’t been deported, she has been pardoned. She can remain in Dubai if she wishes. Her passport has been returned to her,” said Ragnhild Imerslund.

“She will travel home shortly,” the spokeswoman added.

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UPDATED: We learn from BBC that the the pardon came from the ruler of Dubai himself and that part of the deal was that he pardoned the rapist as well – that is the RAPIST was PARDONED from having had EXTRAMARITAL SEX – as the language of the Islamic Prosecutor. Really – this makes it even worse.

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on June 25th, 2013
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

from: Ricken Patel of  www.Avaaz.org

30 months to save the world

Dear Avaaz community,

This may be the most important email I’ve written to you. Scientists have found that vast areas of Arctic sea ice are disappearing, accelerating the destruction of our planet — it is a climate tipping point and we CAN stop it, if we act very fast, and all together. We have 30 months until the biggest climate summit ever. To win it, we need to blast out of the starting gate. Click below to make a donation and help us get there:
Donate now
This may be the most important email I’ve ever written to you.

Scientist Julienne Stroeve has studied Arctic ice for decades. Every summer she travels north to measure how much ice has melted. She knows that climate change is melting the ice fast, but on her last trip, she couldn’t believe what she saw. Vast areas of Arctic ice have disappeared, beyond our worst expectations.

This is what the experts warned us about. As the earth warms, it creates many “tipping points” that accelerate the warming out of control. Warming thaws the Arctic sea ice, destroying the giant white ‘mirror’ that reflects heat back into space, which massively heats up the ocean, and melts more ice, and so on. We spin out of control. Already this year — storms, temperatures — everything is off the charts.

We CAN stop this, if we act very fast, and all together. And out of this extinction nightmare, we can pull one of the most inspiring futures for our children and grandchildren. A clean, green future in balance with the earth that gave birth to us.

We have 30 months until the Paris Summit, the meeting that world leaders have decided will determine the fate of our efforts to fight climate change. It might seem like a long time – it’s not. We have 30 months to get the right leaders in power, get them to that meeting, give them a plan, and hold them accountable. And it’s us vs. the oil companies, and fatalism. We can win, we must, but we need to blast out of the starting gate with donations of just a few dollars/euros/pounds per week until the summit. For the world we dream of, let’s make it happen:
 secure.avaaz.org/donate/en/?cl=2…

Fatalism on climate change is not just futile, it’s also incompetent. The hour is late, but it is still absolutely within our power to stop this catastrophe, simply by shifting our economies from oil and coal to other sources of power. And doing so will bring the world together like never before, in a deep commitment and cooperation to protect our planetary home. It’s a beautiful possibility, and the kind of future Avaaz was born to create.

Facing this challenge will take heart, and hope, and also all the smarts we have. Here’s the plan:

1. Go Political: Elect Climate Leaders — 5 crucial countries have elections in the next 30 months. Let’s make sure the right people win, and with the right mandate. Avaaz is one of the only major global advocacy organizations that can be political. And since this fight will be won or lost politically, it could be at some points just us vs. the oil companies to decide who our politicians listen to.

2. Make Hollande a Hero — French President Francois Hollande will chair the Paris summit – a powerful position. We have to try every tactic and channel — his personal friends and family, his political constituency, his policy advisors — to make him the hero we need him to be to make the summit a success.

3. Take it to the Next Level — The scale of this crisis demands action that goes beyond regular campaigning. It’s time for powerful, direct, non-violent action, to capture imagination, convey moral urgency, and inspire people to act. Think Occupy.

?4. Out the Spoilers — Billionaires like the Koch brothers and their oil companies are the major spoilers in climate change – funding junk science to confuse us and spending millions on misleading PR, while buying politicians wholesale. With investigative journalism and more, we need to expose and counter their horrifically irresponsible actions.

5. Define the Deal — Even in the face of planetary catastrophe, 195 governments in a room can be just incompetent. We need to invest in top quality policy advice to develop ingenious strategies, mechanisms, and careful compromises so that when the summit arrives, a critical mass of leaders are already bought in to a large part of the deal, and no one can claim that good solutions don’t exist.

We need tens of thousands of us to make small donations to blast out of the starting gate on this plan. The amount doesn’t matter as much as the choice – to hope, and to act:
 secure.avaaz.org/donate/en/?cl=2…

At the last major climate summit in Copenhagen 2009, we played a pivotal role in German and Japanese ‘climate’ elections, in shifting Brazilian policy, and in helping win a major global deal on financing, with rich countries promising $100 billion per year to poor countries to help them address climate change. Back then, Avaaz was 3 million people. After Copenhagen, we reflected that we needed to be a lot bigger to meet the challenge posed by climate change. Now, we’re 23 million, and growing by 1 million per month.

Climate change is the ultimate global collective action problem, requiring cooperation from every government in the world. And Avaaz is the ultimate collective action solution, with millions of us united in common vision across every nation. This is our time, to build a world for our children that’s beauty matches our dreams. Let’s get started.

With hope and appreciation for this amazing community,

Ricken and the entire Avaaz team

MORE INFORMATION:

With Arctic sea ice vulnerable, summer melt season begins briskly (The Christian Science Monitor)
 www.csmonitor.com/Environment/201…

Arctic sea ice levels to reach record low within days (Guardian)
 www.guardian.co.uk/environment/20…

Five Reasons We Need a New Global Agreement on Climate Change by 2015 (Switchboard NRDC)
 switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/jschmi…

The Doha climate talks were a start, but 2015 will be the moment of truth (The Guardian)
 www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/…

Arctic sea ice melt disrupts weather patterns (NBC News)
 science.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/05…

The Arctic Ice “Death Spiral” (Slate)
 www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy…

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Posted in Archives, Austria, Brazil, Canada, China, Copenhagen COP15, European Union, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, New York, Norway, Obama Styling, Paris, Real World's News, Reporting From the UN Headquarters in New York, Reporting from UNFCCC Meetings, Reporting from Washington DC, Russia, United Kingdom, Vienna

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on May 10th, 2013
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

Norway, Canada, the United States, and the Tar Sands.

9 May 2013
by James Hansen
Today 36 Norwegian organizations sent an open letter to Prime Minister Stoltenberg expressing opposition to development of Canadian tar sands by Statoil (the Norwegian state is majority shareholder of Statoil). Signatories include not only environmental organizations, but a broad public spectrum, including, appropriately, many youth
organizations.
It is encouraging that Norwegian youth press their government to stop supporting tar sands development, given
the fact that Norway saves much of its oil earnings for future generations and given the fact that Norway is not
likely among the nations that will suffer most from climate change.
I wonder if the Norway government response will be better than their response in 2010.
The gap between public preference and government policy is not unique to Norway. Similar situations were found in other nations, as described in “Storms of My Grandchildren.”
Governments talk green while doing black, supporting or even subsidizing the fossil fuel industry while
doing little to solve fossil fuel addiction.
The Canadian public is also impressive. Most messages that I receive from Canadians are ones of encouragement, apologetic that some government ministers speak out of both sides of their mouth at the same time. On one hand,
they say that tar sands will make Canada the Saudi Arabia of oil. On the other hand, they say that the amount of carbon in tar sands is negligible.
The truth is that the tar sands gook contains more than twice the carbon from all the oil burned in human history.
If infrastructure, such as the Keystone XL pipeline, is built to transport tar sands gook, ways will be developed to extract more and more. When full accounting is done of emissions from tar sands oil, its use is equivalent to burning coal to power your automobile.

This is on top of the grotesque regional tar sands destruction.
There is a basis for optimism that the Keystone pipeline can be stopped and tar sands exploitation phased down before it becomes the monstrosity that oil companies are aiming for.
Tar sands make no economic sense if fossil fuels pay their true costs to society via a gradually rising fee collected from fossil companies in proportion to the amount of carbon in the fuel. Conservatives in the United States are beginning to recognize the merits of a carbon fee, which would be a non-tax, 100% of collected funds distributed to the public on per capita basis.
The Wall Street Journal recently published an article endorsing this approach by George Shultz and Gary Becker, a Nobel prize winning economist. Such a fee levels the playing field among alternative energies and energy efficiency, providing a spur for development of clean energies. After 10 years a carbon fee rising $10 per ton of CO2 per year would reduce United States carbon emissions by 10 – 11 times more than the carbon carried by the Keystone pipeline.
The funds distributed to the public, 60 percent of the people getting more than they pay in increased prices, would spur the economy. The energy revolution would create millions of jobs.
So don’t despair re the tar sands.
There are sensible alternatives.
The common presumption that President Obama is going to approve the Keystone XL pipeline is wrong, in my opinion.
The State Department must provide an assessment to President Obama. Secretary of State John Kerry is expert on the climate issue and has long been one of the most thoughtful members of our government. I cannot believe that Secretary Kerry would let his and President Obama’s legacies go down the tar sands drain.

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on February 11th, 2013
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

Global warming to bring more rain to hydro-dependent Norway.

Date: 11-Feb-13
Country: NORWAY
by: Nerijus Adomaitis

Global warming is likely to bring more rain to hydro-dependent Norway, giving a further boost to power production that reached a record high last year due to ample rainfall, the government said in a report on Friday.

Norway’s power generation reached 146 terawatt-hours (TWh) in 2012, as hydro inflows from rain and snow melt were 5 TWh above normal, Norway’s Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) said. Hydro power accounted for 97 percent of production.

During the past century, precipitation in Norway has risen by about 20 percent, and that trend is expected to continue.

“The extent of the flooding and landslides in Norway is expected to increase as a result of more precipitation and more intense rainfall,” the government said in the report on long-term challenges.

“Meanwhile, more precipitation can result in higher production of hydroelectric power, and milder winters will lead to lower fuel costs,” it added.

“Most studies show that climate change will lead to an increase in the average annual inflow to power plants in Norway, and thereby increase the production potential for hydropower,” said Hege Hisdal, head of hydrologic modeling at NVE.

Weekly precipitation levels, measured in terms of hydro energy available for power production, rose by about 13 percent from 1995 to 2013 in Norway, data from Point Carbon, a Thomson Reuters company, showed.

“So there is a clear increasing trend,” said Bjorn Sonju-Moltzau, a hydrologist at Point Carbon. “We expect precipitation levels that can be used for power generation to increase by 10-15 percent during the next 10-20 years.”

About half of all electricity production in the Nordic power market comes from hydro power.

Hydro production in the region could increase by about 10 percent during the period 2021-2050 from 1961-1990, a reference period to measure climate change, a study commissioned by the Nordic Council of Ministers, showed last year.N

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on January 28th, 2013
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

Norway Debates Overseas Ventures After Siege in Algeria.

Kyrre Lien for The New York Times

A fifth employee of Statoil, which runs the Mongstad refinery in Austrheim and Lindas, Norway, is feared dead after the siege at an Algerian gas facility.

By and HENRIK PRYSER LIBELL
Published in The New York Times on-line: January 27, 2013

AUSTRHEIM, Norway — Oil and gas made Norway one of the world’s most advanced and prosperous countries in just a few decades. Now the deadly siege in Algeria has fired up a debate here over how far its petroleum companies, and their skilled workers, should go in the hunt for resources and profits.

Mayor Per Leroy of Austrheim says Norway’s petroleum industry, particularly the Mongstad refinery in his town, has made the region prosperous.

Kyrre Lien for The New York Times

At the oil refinery in Mongstad, flags are flown at half-staff for the workers lost in the In Amenas seige.

In recent days, the energy giant Statoil has confirmed the deaths of four of the five company employees missing since Islamist militants attacked a gas installation this month at In Amenas, near the Libyan border. Few in Norway held out more than the slimmest hope for the last missing employee.

This sparsely populated region on the North Sea coast, where on winter afternoons children skate on frozen ponds nestled among snow-covered evergreens, might seem to have little in common with the barren Sahara. But the flare of burning gas in the distance at the Mongstad refinery, Norway’s largest, serves as a reminder of why four people from the area found themselves among the 17 Statoil employees at the Algerian facility when it was ambushed.

Since Phillips Petroleum struck oil in 1969 in the Ekofisk field in the North Sea, more and more Norwegians from this coastal region have passed up traditional jobs like fisherman and sailor to become the mechanics and engineers powering the petroleum industry — not just in Norway but also from the Gulf of Mexico to Nigeria.

Austrheim’s mayor, Per Leroy, 55, understands just how much the petroleum industry has meant to the region and the country. “Go back 100 years and the area north of Bergen was one of the poorest in Europe,” Mr. Leroy said. “Now it’s one of the richest.”

Statoil was founded in 1972 through an act of Parliament. It is run as a profit-making company, though the government maintains a roughly two-thirds stake in the business. While many European countries are struggling under growing debt burdens, Norway, thanks to its petroleum reserves, has a sovereign wealth fund with an estimated $700 billion to protect its future.

Norwegians enjoy universal health care, subsidized public universities that are almost free to attend and a generous social security system. Norwegians have a higher-than-average life expectancy, breathe cleaner air and are more satisfied with their lives than the residents of most industrialized countries, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. World Bank figures show that Norway’s economic output of $98,102 per capita in 2011 was more than twice the $48,112 in the United States.

But workers who take their skills from oil platforms on the North Sea to projects in unstable countries are exposing themselves to new risks, a reality thrust into sharp relief by the militants’ assault on In Amenas, an ordeal that drew a powerful counterattack by the Algerian military. In the end, at least 37 foreign hostages were killed.

“You are not just a traveler in the oil business, sometimes you are traveling in an invisible war zone,” said Tom Hella, 35, an oil-drilling operator from the nearby town of Radoy whose career has taken him from Angola to Azerbaijan. But after what happened in Algeria, he said: “The missis just said that that’s it. After this she won’t let me travel anymore.”

That conversation, writ large, is taking place across Norwegian society. Helge Ryggvik, a historian and oil researcher, told the daily Dagsavisen that Norwegian oil companies should withdraw from risky countries.

Even if they are willing to take the chance, the increased security costs of doing business may keep safety-conscious companies away. Henrik Thune, a senior researcher at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs in Oslo, specializing in energy and the Middle East, said, “Western companies will pull out and other countries’ companies, like Chinese, Indian and Russian companies, will replace them.”

In April 2010, Russian and Norwegian leaders finally resolved a 40-year dispute over how to divide the Barents Sea and part of the Arctic Ocean, opening another frontier in oil and natural gas exploration. Newer technologies have meant that existing reserves will remain productive for years to come, while recent discoveries have increased optimism that local production will remain strong for decades.

“They find the Norwegian continental shelf attractive because the political risk is very small,” said Thina Margrethe Saltvedt, an oil analyst at Nordea Markets in Oslo. “Maybe they won’t pull out, but they don’t have to go abroad as they did before,” Ms. Saltvedt said. “We’re still little people in the big world.”

Statoil had already announced last year that it would sell its stake in a giant oil field in Iraq to the Russian company Lukoil.

The Algerian episode has not been as shocking for Norwegian society as the massacre of 69 people in 2011 at a political youth camp at Utoya Island along with a bombing in Oslo that killed eight. That was a trauma from which the nation is still recovering. But those killings, horrifying as they were, did not raise the kinds of policy questions that the events in Algeria do for a country with an outsize stake in the world of energy.

“If we have enough oil, there shouldn’t be reason to send people over there,” said Kim Vagenes, 22, who works at a hardware store here in Austrheim. The municipality, with a population of 2,850, is the hometown of two of the oil workers confirmed dead. “Of course, the oil companies want as much oil as they can get.”

As a young man Mr. Leroy, the mayor of Austrheim, assumed he would go into the shipping business, but construction on the Mongstad refinery began just after he finished high school. “The optimism came back to the people,” he said. “They moved back, built new houses.”

Thanks to the petroleum industry, the unemployment rate in Austrheim averages less than 2 percent. The development has quite literally connected this part of the region of Hordaland to the world. It used to take three hours by boat to get to the regional hub of Bergen. Now it takes an hour by car, using bridges built with oil money. At the airport in Bergen, advertisements promote jobs that “take the next step in Bergen’s oil and gas success” and promise to help customers “maximize their reservoirs’ performance.”

Politicians and business leaders have thus far taken a strong stance, saying they will not be intimidated by acts of violence. Helge Kristoffersen, a managing director at the recruiting firm Mosaique, said that challenging, well-paying job openings would continue to attract candidates.

“Some may shy away from assignments in countries with high risk for a while to come,” Mr. Kristoffersen said, “but we quickly forget.”

Chris Cottrell contributed reporting from Berlin.

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Norway, a country enlightened on many subjects, is considered the Sheiks of Europe when it comes to oil. It is their income from oil that kept it out of the EU – oil making it a Nation that will rather spend on foreign aid then on effects of climate change. At the UN they are an extension of OPEC.

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on December 10th, 2012
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

United States and Russian Federation Conclude Joint Inspection in Antarctica.

Note from the Office of the Spokesperson
The US Department of State.
Washington, DC
December 10, 2012

A joint team from the United States and the Russian Federation concluded a 10-day inspection of foreign research stations, installations and equipment in Antarctica on December 8, 2012.

The team inspected the following stations: Bharati (India), Maitri (India), Princess Elisabeth (Belgium), Syowa (Japan), Troll (Norway) and Zhongshan (China). The United States appreciates the assistance provided by the personnel at all of the visited stations.

The joint inspection was conducted pursuant to the Antarctic Treaty of 1959 and its Environmental Protocol, and was designed to review compliance with Antarctic Treaty system rules and regulations. This included verification that the stations are implementing relevant environmental rules and that facilities are used only for peaceful purposes — honoring the Treaty’s prohibition on measures of a military nature. This inspection effort was facilitated by a Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation in Antarctica signed by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Foreign Minister of the Russian Federation Sergey Lavrov on September 8, 2012.

Officials from the U.S. Department of State and the Russian Federation Ministry of Foreign Affairs led the inspection, which is the second phase of a two-phase process.

A report will be jointly presented by the United States and Russia at the next Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting, to be held in Brussels, Belgium, in May 2013.

The United States and Russia were architects of the Antarctic Treaty of 1959 and today conduct some of the most extensive and diverse scientific activities in Antarctica. Working closely with our Russian counterparts provides an excellent opportunity to reinforce our shared objectives for the peaceful use of Antarctica – and further expands our diplomatic cooperation.

For further information on the United States and Antarctica, visit
:
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Posted in China, Copenhagen COP15, India, Japan, Norway, Policy Lessons from Mad Cow Disease, Reporting From the UN Headquarters in New York, Reporting from Washington DC, Russia, Three Poles Melting

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on December 1st, 2012
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)


Six EU leaders to skip Nobel gala

30.11.12 @ 09:51

By Andrew Rettman on www.EUobserver.com

BRUSSELS – Six EU leaders, including the UK, are to skip the Nobel gala next month, as criticism of the award multiplies.

  • A Nobel – the EU award continues to stir debate (Photo: EUobserver)

Nobel Institute director Geir Lundestad told EUobserver on Friday (30 November) that 18 EU leaders will come to watch the Union’s top three officials – Herman Van Rompuy, Jose Manuel Barroso and Martin Schulz – collect the peace prize in Oslo on 10 December.

He declined to list them. But he indicated that they include the “big” countries – France, Germany, Italy, Poland and Spain.

He said six others – including the Czech republic, Sweden and the UK – have confirmed they are not going, while the rest are still making up their mind.

The British and Czech decisions come from two eurosceptic VIPs – David Cameron and Vaclav Klaus – and are likely to fuel talk on whether Cameron thinks the UK is on its way out of the bloc.

Sweden’s Frederik Reinfeldt cannot go because he is busy in a parallel Nobel event in Stockholm the same day.

Lundestad declined to speculate on whether Cameron and Klaus’ decision amounts to a boycott. “It’s up to them to explain why they are not coming,” he said.

But he did criticise four cabinet ministers from Norway’s eurosceptic Centre Party for also deciding to stay away.

“They put the emphasis on Norway and whether Norway should be a member of the EU or not. The committee dos not address that question. It recognises the EU’s contribution to a more peaceful Europe through six decades. It has nothing to do with Norway,” he noted.

The Nobel decision back in October prompted debate on whether the EU deserves the prize.

Some of the arguments were repeated this week.

For his part, the Austrian leader of the centre-left S&D group in the EU parliament, Hannes Swoboda, said in a debate in Brussels: “The EU was a vision for peace, after WWII. And the EU brought peace.”

But a joint letter by the World Council of Churches and the Conference of European Churches said: “The economic and humanitarian tragedy today in Greece challenges the EU as a peace builder for the next generation.”

Meanwhile, the recent Gaza crisis – which claimed 168 Palestinian lives and five Israeli ones – prompted a fresh rebuke.

A joint letter by 52 former peace prize laureates, artists, academics and diplomats on Wednesday said the EU should be disqualified for its ties to Israel.

“The role of the European Union must not go unnoticed, in particular its hefty subsidies to Israel’s military complex through its research programmes,” they wrote.

Former Nobel laureates Desmond Tutu, Mairead Maguire and Adolfo Perez Esquivel also wrote a letter attacking the EU as a party in conflicts around the world.

“The EU is clearly not ‘the champion of peace’ that Alfred Nobel had in mind when he wrote his will … The Norwegian Nobel committee has redefined and remodelled the prize in a manner that is not consistent with the law,” they said.

They called for the committee to withhold the prize money of €930,000, even though the EU has promised to give it to charities for child victims of war.

For his part, Lundestad said the Tutu letter was organised by Fredrik Heffermehl, a Norwegian jurist who has “protested for many, many years against every decision of the Nobel committee.”

He added: “The prize money has never been withheld.”

Related:

  1. Barroso and Van Rompuy win battle for Nobel limelight
  2. Pride, confusion and sour grapes after EU wins Nobel
  3. EU ambassador to attend Nobel gala despite Chinese ‘bullying’

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on August 20th, 2012
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

First Chinese ship crosses Arctic Ocean amid record melt.

First Chinese ship crosses Arctic Ocean amid record melt Photo: China Daily
A general view shows Chinese ice breaker ship ”Xuelong”, also called ”Snow Dragon”, docking at Tianjin November 3, 2011.
Photo: China Daily

An icebreaker has become the first ship from China to cross the Arctic Ocean, underscoring Beijing’s growing interest in a remote region where a record thaw caused by climate change may open new trade routes.

The voyage highlights how China, the world’s no.2 economy, is extending its reach to the Arctic which is rich in oil and gas and is a potential commercial shipping route between the north Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

The icebreaker Xuelong, or Snow Dragon, arrived in Iceland this week after sailing the Northern Route along the coast of Russia.

Expedition leader Huigen Yang, head of the Polar Research Institute of China, said he had expected a lot more ice along the route at this time of year than the vessel encountered.

“To our astonishment … most part of the Northern Sea Route is open,” he told Reuters TV. The icebreaker would return to China by a route closer to the North Pole.

He said that Beijing was interested in the “monumental change” in the polar environment caused by global warming.

Sea ice floating on the Arctic Ocean is on track to beat a record low set in 2007, making the region more accessible but threatening the hunting lifestyles of indigenous peoples and wildlife such as polar bears and seals.

The thaw is slowly opening up the Arctic as a short-cut route – the German-based Beluga Group, for instance, sent a cargo vessel north from Korea to Rotterdam in 2009.

RECORD THAW

“The (Chinese) journey indicates a growing interest in the melting of the ice in the northern regions and how climate change is affecting the globe and the future of all nations,” the office of Icelandic President Olafur Ragnar Grimsson said.

Arctic sea ice extent on August 13 fell to 5.09 million square km (1.97 million square miles) – an area smaller than Brazil, according to the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center.

Sea ice reaches its smallest in September before expanding again as winter approaches. China has overtaken the United States as the top greenhouse gas emitter, mainly from burning fossil fuels, ahead of the European Union, India and Russia.

“China’s interest is a mix of business, science and geo-politics,” said Jan Gunnar Winther, director of the Norwegian Polar Institute.

For countries outside the region like China, there may be more opportunities to supply equipment to aid drilling, he said. South Korea’s Hyundai, for instance, is building a floating production unit for the Goliat oilfield in Norway’s Barents Sea.

Winther said that research into climate change in the Arctic was also relevant to China’s understanding of weather patterns that could affect its farmers.

China has applied to become an observer at the Arctic Council, made up of the United States, Russia, Canada, Sweden, Finland, Norway, Denmark and Iceland.

“The application will be handled in May next year,” said Nina Buvang Vaaja, head of the Arctic Council Secretariat.

Other applicants seeking to join the Council, which oversees management of the region, are Japan, South Korea, the European Union Commission and Italy. Germany, Britain, France, Poland, Spain and the Netherlands are already observers.

Date: 18-Aug-2012 - Reporting By Alister Doyle – Reuters.

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on August 3rd, 2012
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

Beskrivelse: Beskrivelse: Beskrivelse: Beskrivelse: cid:image001.gif@01CCEBDA.EE588BC0

from: Anna  carnegieendowment.org/files/RussiaClimate.pdf

Abstract

Regardless of many benefits available to Russia from adopting a more practical approach to climate mitigation, the country remains on the outskirts of the international climate policy debate—an important element of foreign policy in this decade. Russian leaders tend to point to the post-Soviet decline of Russia’s greenhouse gas emissions as a major contribution to global climate mitigation efforts. Yet, because the country’s carbon intensity remains very high, that stance undermines Russia’s role as a serious global climate actor.

Recognizing its limited progress with climate mitigation policies and its responsibility to contribute more would create a better foundation for Russia’s strategic role. A number of “no-regrets” policy steps are available:

  • Domestically adopting the mitigation pledge announced at the Copenhagen climate conference
  • Implementing a domestic offsetting or emissions trading scheme that could act as a bridge to international carbon trading activities
  • Further developing the “Russian Proposal,” which seeks to encourage a wider group of countries to make climate commitments

Russia’s stance on the Kyoto Protocol and allocating the potential burdens in climate mitigation is similar to many other industrialized countries’ approaches. This provides Moscow a good platform to create a cooperative role for itself in global climate diplomacy. Moreover, Russia’s current mitigation policies—regardless of the delays in their implementation—are slowly changing the country’s previous image of being just a potential seller of carbon credits to a more serious player in mitigation.

However, making the most of its opportunity to develop a strategic role requires Moscow to take climate policy much more seriously. The Kremlin’s climate change path boils down to political will—and whether climate change is considered important enough—as well as its ability to engage in serious strategic thinking and policy preparation.

Best regards,

Dr Anna Korppoo

Senior Research Fellow

Editor of FNI Climate Policy Perspectives

Fridtjof Nansen Institute

P.O.Box 326, 1326 Lysaker, Norway

Tel: +47 67111900 / 67111908 (dir) / 90033829 (mob)

anna.korppoo@fni.nowww.fni.no

www.fni.no/climatepolicyperspectives

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on July 25th, 2012
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

please see also our previous posting:

Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on February 18th, 2012

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Cut air pollution, buy time to slow climate change: US.

Cutting soot and other air pollutants could help “buy time” in the fight against climate change, a senior U.S. official said on Tuesday as seven nations joined a Washington-led plan.

Air pollution, from sources ranging from wood-fired cooking stoves in Africa to cars in Europe, may be responsible for up to six million deaths a year worldwide and is also contributing to global warming, the U.N. Environment Programme (UNEP) said.

Seven countries — Britain, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy and Jordan — formally joined the U.S.-led Climate and Clean Air Initiative, bringing the total of members to about 20 since the plan was launched in February.

“If we are able to do this we could really buy time in the context of the global problem to combat climate change,” Jonathan Pershing, U.S. deputy special envoy for climate change, told a telephone news briefing from Paris.

Pershing said that time was “desperately” needed to slow global warming. Unlike other developed nations, the United States has not passed laws to cut greenhouse gas emissions despite proposed cuts by President Barack Obama.

Pershing said that Washington was in talks trying to attract more nations to the air pollution plan, including China and India which are the number one and three emitters of greenhouse gases respectively, with the United States in second.

The U.S.-led plan in Paris focuses on limiting soot, heat-trapping methane, ground level ozone and HFC gases. Soot, for instance, can speed the melt of Arctic ice when it lands as a dark dusting that soaks up more heat and thaws ice.

Soot can also cause respiratory diseases.

By contrast, U.N. plans for fighting climate change focus mainly on carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gas released by burning fossil fuels that are blamed for causing more droughts, floods, wildfires and rising sea levels.

The U.N. Environment Programme, which is a partner with the U.S. initiative, said that success could reduce the projected rise in global temperatures from a build-up of greenhouse gases by 0.5 degree Celsius (0.9 Fahrenheit) by 2050.

By 2030, fast action could also prevent millions of premature deaths and avoid the annual loss of 30 million tons of crops, it said.

Pershing said that the small amount mobilized so far in pilot projects — $13 million — could catalyze wider change. And many projects paid for themselves in greater efficiency.

Karen Luken, of the C40 Partnership and the Clinton Climate Initiative, said that exploiting methane from trash decomposing in a landfill in Mexico City had reduced greenhouse gases and was providing energy for 35,000 homes.

“We will use that model in other places, such as Lagos.”

Quotes from new partners

Finland
“The need to limit short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) has grown.  In the Arctic region, in particular, black carbon emissions and deposition must be reduced.  Controlling all SLCP emissions will complement international efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, in order to combat climate change as effectively as possible.  Limiting fine particulates will also alleviate health risk”, states Ville Niinistö, Finland’s Minister of the Environment.

Germany
“The German Government is delighted to be a part of the Climate and Clean Air Coalition to Reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants.  Germany has already initiated extensive measures at national and international level to curb these substances.  The Coalition can play a key role in achieving this and thus supplement the efforts of international climate policy and other environmental areas such as air quality control and the protection of the ozone layer”, according to the Federal Environment Minister of Germany, Peter Altmaier.
==============================

The initiatives were agreed at the first ministerial of the Coalition held in Stockholm, Sweden, in April during the celebrations of the 40th anniversary of the first UN Conference on the Human Environment.

Methane Emissions from Municipal Waste
Waste generated world-wide is responsible for an estimated one-third of global methane emissions—a greenhouse gas over 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide and one linked to the generation of ground level ozone that is not only damaging to crops but human health.

The Coalition is working with the Global Methane Initiative and the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, which is partnered with the Clinton Climate Initiative, to assist urban areas to cut methane emissions from across the waste chain including from landfills and pollution linked with organic waste like food.

The initiative is also planning to assist cities in reducing open burning of municipal waste, which results in harmful black carbon emissions.

A dedicated web-based platform, through which cities world-wide can share experiences, achievements and best practices, will be launched.

At today’s meeting in Paris, the Coalition discussed progress on this initiative, including plans to work with an initial group of up to 10 cities during the next 12 months through measures such as waste inventories, enhanced composting and recycling, landfill management, and comprehensive waste sector planning.

Emissions from Brick Kilns
The manufacture of bricks in developing countries is often linked with significant emissions of toxic fumes including black carbon.

The Coalition is assessing how to assist countries to switch to more efficient and mechanized “firing” technologies.

A recent study in India and Vietnam indicates that modernizing 35,000 old brick kilns in the region could cut black carbon emissions by 40,000 tons, equal to 27 million tons of CO2.

Mexico, which has secured close to $1 million from the Global Environment Facility to carry out the first national assessment of SLCPs including those from its estimated 20,000 traditional brick kilns, is planning a Coalition workshop in September to advance action in the region.

The Coalition is also putting in place the awareness raising and knowledge generation needed to fast track demonstration projects.

Reducing Black Carbon Emissions from Heavy Duty Diesel Vehicles and Engines
The Coalition discussed many different methods of reducing black carbon from heavy duty diesel vehicles and engines—emissions that are not only a health risk but contribute to melting in the Arctic.

The use of low-sulphur fuels opens up the possibility of one method — fitting particle or black carbon filters to heavy duty vehicles.

Efforts under the UNEP-hosted Clean Fuels and Vehicles Partnership, originally established to phase lead out of petrol, are now focused on reducing sulphur levels in transport fuels.  The Coalition is planning to build off of UNEP’s existing sulphur reduction efforts to also tackle black carbon emissions.

Promoting Alternatives to HFCs
HFCs are increasingly being used  as replacements to CFCs in areas such as air conditioners, refrigeration and foams because they have zero impact on the ozone layer–the Earth’s shield that filters out dangerous levels of the sun’s ultra violet rays.

However, studies indicate that some HFCs are powerful greenhouse gases and if these become widespread they could be responsible for emissions equivalent to 3.5 to 8.8 gigatonnes (Gt) of carbon dioxide (Gt CO2eq) — comparable to current annual emissions from the entire global transport system, estimated at around 6-7 Gt annually.

There are many climate-friendlier replacements available and opportunities to reduce HFC emissions through advanced technologies as well as best service practices.

The Coalition is catalysing awareness of the risks and the alternatives. This week it convened a packed meeting of industry and governments in Bangkok, Thailand, aimed at fast tracking these aims.

Emissions from Oil and Gas Industry
Venting and leakage from oil and gas systems account for over a fifth of global man-made methane emissions and represent estimated economic losses of $27 billion to over $60 billion a year.

An estimated one-third of these losses can be reduced at zero cost with existing technologies and practices. Meanwhile, flaring also leads to emissions of black carbon.

Action is underway to address the issue through initiatives such as the Global Methane Initiative, the Natural Gas STAR International programme, and the Global Gas Flaring Reduction (GGFR) Partnership.

The Coalition is planning to build upon those efforts by working with industry, countries and investors to catalyse accelerated action.

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on June 7th, 2012
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

BREAKING DOWN THE POLITICAL BARRIERS TO FOSSIL-FUEL SUBSIDY REFORM.

Date/Time: Thursday 21 June 2012, 15:00 – 16:30

Location: Rio Centro Convention Centre – Room T-5, Rio Centro

———————-


Globally, governments subsidize fossil fuels to the tune of over $600 billion per year.

These subsidies directly contribute to over-consumption of fossil fuels and higher emissions of local and global pollutants.

They are also socially regressive, generally benefitting wealthier consumers more than the poor.

Yet reforming fossil-fuel subsidies is challenging. If introduced too quickly, and without sufficient public support, it can have serious political repercussions.

Moreover, there are often concerns about negative effects on the competitiveness of domestic energy-intensive industries.

This session, organised by the International Institute for Sustainable Development’s Global Subsidies Initiative and the Government of Switzerland, aims to foster an open and constructive discussion among all stakeholders on the political barriers to fossil-fuel subsidy reform and how they can be overcome.

Panel:

  • ·         Moderator: Mark Halle, Director, International Institute for Sustainable Development

Speakers:

  • ·        Keynote speaker: Hon. Martin Lindegaard, Minister for Climate, Energy and Building, Denmark
  • ·         Mr. Majid Al-Suwaidi, Deputy Director of Energy and Climate Change, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, United Arab Emirates
  • ·         Mr. Hans-Peter Egler, Head of Trade Promotion, State Secretariat for Economic Affairs, Switzerland
  • ·         Mr. Fabby Tumiwa, Institute for Essential Services Reform, Indonesia
  • ·         Ms. Kerryn Lang, Global Subsidies Initiative, IISD

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on June 6th, 2012
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

From The Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation:

New publication: Development Dialogue no.59

No future without justice – Report of the Civil Society Reflection Group on Global Development Perspectives

The world faces an unprecedented coincidence of global crises. They testify to the failure of the dominant model of development and economic progress that is oriented on a technocratic modernisation path, is blind to human rights and the ecological limits of the global ecosystem, confuses growth of Gross Domestic Product with progress in society, and regards poverty as a primarily technical challenge in which categories of inequality and social justice are neglected.

The Civil Society Reflection Group on Global Development Perspectives brought together 18 civil society activists and scholars from different disciplines from around the globe. Its members jointly drew lessons from the current crises, looked beyond conventional development concepts and goals, questioned the models and measures of development and social progress, and presented alternatives.

This report is the main outcome of the joint deliberations. It describes the root causes of the multiple crises, reconfirms the framework of universal principles and rights, reconsiders development goals and indicators, and draws conclusions for the post-2015 development agenda. It seeks to stimulate debates about alternative development paths, participatory and inclusive governance structures, and the transformation in politics and societies that future justice for all will require.

Read online

Download as pdf

Pressrelease

Have a nice day,

Henning Melber

Executive Director
The
Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation.

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on May 11th, 2012
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

From:

Sustainable Energy Policy & Practice is published in cooperation with the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) and with funding from the United Arab Emirates Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Directorate of Energy and Climate Change)

==============================

and as reported by the IISD Conference Recording Organization:

SE4ALL Publishes Global Action Agenda to Encourage Concerted Action on Sustainable Energy for All
Read More: SE4ALL Publishes Global Action Agenda to Encourage Concerted Action on Sustainable Energy for All

25_April_2012: UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon’s Sustainable Energy for All (SE4ALL) Initiative has published an Action Agenda, containing summaries of key action areas to realize SE4ALL and an implementation roadmap to begin working towards that goal.

The document, titled “Sustainable Energy for All: A Global Action Agenda – Pathways for Concerted Action toward Sustainable Energy for All,” begins by identifying 11 high-impact “Action Areas” that can be leveraged to create and support an environment for widespread deployment of sustainable energy globally. These areas include seven sectors: 1) modern cooking appliances and fuels; 2) distributed electricity solutions; 3) grid infrastructure and supply efficiency; 4) large-scale renewable power; 5) industrial and agricultural processes; 6) transportation; and 7) buildings and appliances. It also includes four enabling action areas: 1) energy planning and policies; 2) business model and technology innovation; 3) finance and risk management; and 4) capacity building and knowledge sharing.

The Action Agenda continues with a chapter focused around an illustrative roadmap table for beginning work on the Action Areas. The table includes progress needed immediately (by the UN Conference on Sustainable Development- UNCSD, or Rio+20), in the short term (by 2015), and in the long term (2015-2030) at the country level in both developing and developed countries, at the sectoral level, and on enabling conditions to allow progress at these levels to begin. The document continues and concludes with a chapter on mobilizing action, outlining specific high-impact opportunities in each Action Area.

The Action Agenda was launched at the Clean Energy Ministerial, which took place on 25-26 April in London, UK.

The SE4ALL initiative is part of the UN’s International Year for Sustainable Energy for All, and has three main objectives: ensuring universal access to modern energy services; doubling the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency; doubling the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix. [Publication:

Sustainable Energy for All: A Global Action Agenda – Pathways for Concerted Action toward Sustainable Energy for All] [IISD RS Story on New Clean Energy Initiatives and Commitments Announced at CEM3]

———————————————————————–


and from the most outspoken Clean Energy advocates from among the G77 – The Small Island Independent States:t

SIDS High-Level Conference on SE4ALL Adopts Barbados Declaration
Read More: SIDS High-Level Conference on SE4ALL Adopts Barbados Declaration

9 May 2012:

On the second day of the SIDS High-Level Conference on Sustainable Development for All (SE4ALL), which convened in Bridgetown, Barbados, from 7-8 May 2012, delegates from the three SIDS regions – the Pacific, Caribbean and Atlantic, Indian Ocean, Mediterranean, and South China Sea  (AIMS) – unanimously adopted the Barbados Declaration, which will be taken to the Rio+20 Conference in June.

The Barbados Declaration addresses challenges, opportunities, commitments and initiatives on sustainable energy in SIDS and the Rio+20 Conference, and includes an Annex of voluntary commitments by SIDS.

On Challenges, the Declaration notes that SIDS remain highly vulnerable, notably due to their small open economies, narrow resource base, disadvantages in economies of scale, remoteness, high export concentration, high dependency on imports with high vulnerability to energy and food price shocks, and relatively high levels of national debt.

On Opportunities, the Declaration emphasizes the availability of commercially feasible options for providing energy, such as wind, solar, geothermal and ocean energy, and that many SIDS are particularly suited to these options because of their geographical location. However, it notes that these technologies must be made accessible, affordable and adaptable to the needs and particular circumstances of SIDS communities.

On Commitments, the Declaration affirms the commitment by SIDS to work towards continued development and implementation of policies and plans to ensure the transformation of the current fossil fuel based energy sector to a modern, affordable and efficient renewable energy sector.

On Initiatives, the Declaration acknowledged and welcomed the work of SIDS DOCK, which is a sustainable energy initiative of SIDS in collaboration with the UNDP, World Bank, and donors. The Declaration also acknowledges the role of of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in supporting SIDS in their efforts to accelerate renewable energy deployment, calls for its greater involvement in supporting SIDS’ efforts, and encourages SIDS that have not joined IRENA to consider doing so.

On the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (UNCSD, or Rio+20), the Declaration reiterates that the outcomes of the meeting must be ambitious and reflect the needs of SIDS.

The Annex contains voluntary commitments by 19 SIDS: Barbados, Cape Verde, Cook Islands, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guyana, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Nauru, Palau, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Seychelles, Timor Leste, Tonga, and Tuvalu. The commitments include Barbados’ announcement of its plan to increase the share of renewable energy in Barbados to 29% of all electricity consumption by 2029. Maldives committed to achieve carbon neutrality in the energy sector by year 2020. Marshall Islands pledged to electrify all urban households and 95% of rural outer atoll households by 2015. Mauritius committed to increasing the share of renewable energy – including solar power, wind energy, hydroelectric power, bagasse and landfill gas – to 35% or more by 2025. And Seychelles committed to produce 15% of its energy supply from renewable energy by 2030. The Annex will remain open for further inscriptions until 25 May.

The Conference was organised by UNDP in partnership with the Government of Barbados, SIDS DOCK, the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, British High Commission Bridgetown, Archers Hall, Australian Aid and the United Nations Foundation.

[Barbados Declaration] [Meeting Website][IISD RS coverage of the meeting]

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on April 13th, 2012
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

What government can afford to allow an activity without insurance?

What if the activity is outside National frontiers – in the Global Commons. Who has then to license such activities?

Arctic oil rush will ruin ecosystem, warns Lloyd’s of London.

Insurance market joins environmentalists in highlighting risks of drilling in fragile region as $100bn investment is predicted.

www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/apr/12/lloyds-london-warns-risks-arctic-oil-drilling

and 

The Guardian, Wednesday 11 April 2012

Lloyd’s of London, the world’s biggest insurance market, has become the first major business organisation to raise its voice about huge potential environmental damage from oil drilling in the Arctic.

The City institution estimates that $100bn (£63bn) of new investment is heading for the far north over the next decade, but believes cleaning up any oil spill in the Arctic, particularly in ice-covered areas, would present “multiple obstacles, which together constitute a unique and hard-to-manage risk”.

Richard Ward, Lloyd’s chief executive, urged companies not to “rush in [but instead to] step back and think carefully about the consequences of that action” before research was carried out and the right safety measures put in place.

The main concerns, outlined in a report drawn up with the help of the Chatham House thinktank, come as the future of the Arctic is reviewed by a House of Commons select committee and just two years after the devastating BP blowout in the Gulf of Mexico.

The far north has become a centre of commercial attention as global temperatures rise, causing ice to melt in a region that could hold up to a quarter of the world’s remaining hydrocarbon reserves.

Cairn Energy and Shell are among the oil companies that have either started or are planning new wells off the coasts of places such as Greenland and Canada, while Total – currently at the centre of a North Sea gas leak – wants to develop the Shtokman field off Russia.

Shtokman is the largest single potential offshore Arctic project, 350 miles into the Russian-controlled part of the Barents Sea, where investment could reach $50bn.

A BP joint venture is planning to spend up to $10bn on developing onshore oilfields in the Yamal-Nenets autonomous area of Russia, despite its experiences with the Macondo oil spill in the relatively benign waters of the Gulf. A series of onshore mining schemes are also planned, with Lakshmi Mittal, Britain’s richest man, wanting to develop a new opencast mine 300 miles inside the Arctic circle in a bid to extract up to £14bn of iron ore.

But the new report from Lloyd’s, written by Charles Emmerson and Glada Lahn of Chatham House, says it is “highly likely” that future economic activity in the Arctic will further disturb ecosystems already stressed by the consequences of climate change.

“Migration patterns of caribou and whales in offshore areas may be affected. Other than the direct release of pollutants into the Arctic environment, there are multiple ways in which ecosystems could be disturbed, such as the construction of pipelines and roads, noise pollution from offshore drilling, seismic survey activity or additional maritime traffic as well as through the break-up of sea ice.”

The authors point out that the Arctic is not one but several ecosystems, and is “highly sensitive to damage” that would have a long-term impact. They are calling for “baseline knowledge about the natural environment and consistent environmental monitoring”. Pollution sources include mines, oil and gas installations, industrial sites and, in the Russian Arctic, nuclear waste from civilian and military installations, and from nuclear weapons testing on Novaya Zemlya. The report singles out a potential oil spill as the “greatest risk in terms of environmental damage, potential cost and insurance” – but says there are significant knowledge gaps in this area.

Rates of natural biodegradation of oil in the Arctic could be expected to be lower than in more temperate environments such as the Gulf of Mexico, although there is currently insufficient understanding of how oil will degrade over the long term in the Arctic. Sea ice could assist in some oil-spill response techniques, such as in-situ burning and chemical dispersant application, but this could lead to air pollution and the release of chemicals into the marine environment without knowing where moving ice will eventually carry them.

Unclear legal boundaries posed by a mosaic of regulations and governments in the Arctic are an additional challenge. The Lloyd’s report notes that there is no international liability and compensation regime for oil spills. An EU proposal under discussion would apply to offshore oil projects in the Arctic territories of Norway and Denmark, and possibly to all EU companies anywhere they operate.

Meanwhile, a taskforce is drawing up recommendations for the intergovernmental Arctic Council on an international instrument on marine oil pollution designed to speed up the process for clean-up and compensation payments, due for release next year. This may include an international liability and compensation instrument. Greenland has argued that “different national systems may lead to ambiguities and unnecessary delays in oil pollution responses and compensation payments” and that any regime must adapt as understanding of the worst-case scenario in the Arctic changes.

The Lloyd’s report says the “inadequacies” of both company and government in the event of a disaster were demonstrated after the Macondo blowout. A smaller company than BP, faced with estimated $40bn clean-up and compensation costs, might have gone bankrupt, leaving the state to foot the bill, it notes.

Lloyd’s says it is essential that there is more investment in science and research to “close knowledge gaps, reduce uncertainties and manage risks”. It calls for sizeable investment in infrastructure and surveillance to enable “safe economic activity” and argues that “full-scale exercises based on worst-case scenarios of environmental disaster should be run by companies”.

The Arctic’s vulnerable environment, unpredictable climate and lack of a precedent on which to base cost assessments have led some environmental NGOs to argue that no compensation would be worth the risk of allowing drilling to take place in pristine offshore areas. Others are campaigning for more stringent regulations and the removal of the liability cap for investors.

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