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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on February 21st, 2014
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

 

 

Global launch of the International Year of Small Island Developing States
 
Monday, 24 February
UN Headquarters, Trusteeship Council
10:00 am

The United Nations will launch the International Year of Small Islands Developing States to celebrate the economic, social and cultural contributions that this group of countries has made to the world, as well as raise awareness of the challenges they face such as climate change and rising sea levels. The Year will highlight the common links between small islands developing States and other countries, and encourage new partnerships to achieve a sustainable future for generations to come.
 
UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon will open the ceremony along with the President of the General Assembly, John W. Ashe. A promotional video for the Year will be showcased followed by statements from senior representatives of small island developing States. The ceremony will close with cultural performances from each of the three small island regions.
 
WHO:            
Mr. Ban Ki-moon, UN Secretary-General
Mr. John W. Ashe, General Assembly President
Mr. Wu Hongbo, Secretary-General of the Third International Conference on the Small Islands Developing States
Mr. Baron Divavesi Waqa, President of Nauru
Mr. Tuilaepa Sailele Malielegaoi, Prime Minister of Samoa
Ms. Maxine Pamela Ometa McClean, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Barbados
Mr. Devanand Virahsawmy, Minister of Environment and Sustainable Development of Mauritius
Mr. Warren Chanansigh, Major Groups Representative

Master of Ceremonies: Mr. Ronald Jumeau, Ambassador of Climate Change and Small Island Developing States, Seychelles
 
The event will be webcast live on UN Web TV. webtv.un.org/
For more information see: www.un.org/islands2014
 Hashtag: #islands2014

===================================================

THIS IS A VERY UNUSUAL EVENT AT THE UN – A CELEBRATION OF LIFE FOR DIEING STATES – STATES IN DANGER OF SINKING INTO THE RISING SEAS CAUSED BY THE INCOMPREHENSIBLE GLUTTONY FOR FOSSIL FUELS BY OTHER STATES – WE WILL BE THERE TO REPORT ON THIS AND TO WATCH IF THE OTHERS DO SHOW UP AT THE CELEBRATION. 

 

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on November 3rd, 2013
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

 

 

from: Leida Rijnhout

Executive Director
ANPED – Northern Alliance for Sustainability
Fiennesstraat 77, 1070 Brussels

Mob: + 32 (0) 494 89 30 52

Dear Colleagues (please circulate),

As you know, the Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States will be held from 1 to 4 September 2014 in Apia, Samoa, to be preceded by activities related to the conference from 28 to 30 August 2014, also in Apia, Samoa. It will focus the world’s attention on a group of countries that remain a special case for sustainable development in view of their unique and particular vulnerabilities.


A Conference website has been prepared by the SIDS 2014 Secretariat, available at
www.sids2014.org

Preparatoryprocess


Several preparatory meetings are taking place throughout 2013, including national preparations and expert group meetings, following three regional meetings and an inter-regional meeting. A special accreditation process for organizations wanting to participate in the Conference and it’s preparation that are not in Consultative Status with ECOSOC. More information will be provided as decisions are made. A Global Intergovernmental Preparatory process will be launched by the President of the General Assembly at the end of 2013, with the first preparatory committee meeting to occur early in 2014. The preparatory process can be followed on the following page:
www.sids2014.org/index.php?menu=1494.

The page available at
www.sids2014.org/index.php?menu=1509  lists various activities undertaken by the UN system, including expert meetings and other relevant events/conferences. If you wish to have a meeting/event included on this page, please send us the details to dsd@un.org.

Partnerships for Small Island Developing States


The modality resolution adopted during the 67th session (
www.sids2014.org/content/documents/186N1249102.pdf) of the General Assembly called for the “strengthening of collaborative partnerships between SIDS and the international community” as one of the important ways and means to address new and emerging challenges and opportunities for the sustainable development of Small Island Developing States (SIDS).  At the SIDS inter-regional preparatory meeting held in Barbados, SIDS decided to recommend that the overarching theme of the Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States should be “the sustainable development of SIDS through genuine and durable partnerships.

The SIDS 2014 Conference website provides a “Partnerships Registry” of new and existing partnerships related to the sustainable development of SIDS, including relevant voluntary commitments from the Rio+20 Conference. It is expected that the SIDS Conference will lead to the announcements of new SIDS partnerships.


If you wish to include a Partnership in the Conference Partnerships Registry, please either 1) Register it online (address below), or 2) send us the details to
dsd@un.org for inclusion



Warm regards,

Chantal Line

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on May 31st, 2012
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

2012 G-20 Mexico summit
Host country Mexico
Date June 18 – 19
Venue(s) to be determined
Cities Los CabosBaja California
Participants G-20 members
Follows Cannes summit, 2011
Precedes Russia summit, 2013
Website G2012 México.org

www.g20.org/en

On the way to Rio the Rio Summit – June 20-22 – Mexico believes the forum June 18-19, can better represent developing countries in both vision and policy. Under the leadership of President Felipe Calderón, Mexico will seek to expand the scope of the G-20’s development focus.

At the recent CARICOM meeting in Barbados Mexico SAid:

The Mexican G20 Presidency does not intend to replace international organizations, but to guide and promote the processes undertaken in those organizations. We consider it a fundamental platform for dialogue, analysis and proposals that will allow peoples and governments to understand their mutual problems and to find their solutions.

Specifically, under Mexico’s G20 Presidency, we have put together an ambitious agenda for development. The present economic crisis will not be the only topic, nor is it likely to be the main concern on the agenda. We expect to discuss long-term plans for sustainable, balanced growth in   the future.

As a result, in the talks prior to the actual Summit meeting, we have included more subjects on development than have been discussed at any other Summit.

The current world financial crisis is on the agenda, but we have also included economic development of poor countries.

The restructuring of international financial institutions is part of the agenda; but we have also included, the topic of financial inclusion for the world’s poorest families, who are not eligible for loans or credit and whose future looks very bleak.

We have included topics regarding the economic balance between nations; but we have also included food security, knowing that the poorest people in the world, millions of which live in our countries, have suffered from severely harsh food price increases for years.

As per all our previous discussions, we are insisting on having such issues as infrastructure and green growth included on the agenda.

Another characteristic of the Mexican G20 agenda is the attempt to make the consulting process more inclusive. As President of the G20, Mexico has gone to great lengths to incorporate the opinions of all countries, particularly those of developing nations, through dialogue undertaken with non-member countries, a case in point being the CARICOM.

We have also invited Chile, as the President of the CILAC, to take part in the G20 Summit.

For Mexico, it is very important to hear the perspectives of developing countries regarding the best way to increase world economic growth.

I am aware of the problems experienced by many countries in the Caribbean, some of which are quite vulnerable, and I am aware of the fact that the classification of one of these countries as a middle-income nation results in unfair treatment for many of them.

That is why I would like to assure you, my dear friends, that Mexico will  try hard – we are already working on it– to have the ideas and suggestions of the CARICOM members considered during the next meeting the Leaders of the G20 in Los Cabos.

The Caribbean nations can count on Mexico as a friend and partner that will represent this region –a region we are proud to be a part of–.actively within the G20.

Ladies and gentleman, Heads of State and Government of the CARICOM and of the Caribbean region.

Mexico is a proud Caribbean country and we look on the sea that touches all our shores not as an obstacle that separates us, but rather as a bridge that will lead us to a better future.

History, geography, and culture have enabled us to have a common destiny.

Something I am also very interested in, an issue we will discuss at the G20, but that we will also have an opportunity to discuss here at this Summit, is the issue of the environment and the need to seek environmental alternatives.

Mexico – and I personally – share the concern of the island states, particularly with respect to climate change, the potential rise of sea levels, and the consequential demand for international commitment and action here and now.

This is why Mexico will continue to share and sympathize with the environmental anxieties of island states, including those of the CARICOM. This is not just a matter of charitable concern, but a true preoccupation for their survival.

As a result, we are also committed to finding alternative and renewable sources energy in order to be able to face the problems of climate change and also to lessen, through those alternatives, the suffering that our poorest families face given the price of fuel today.

My friends, It is a privilege for me to be in Barbados, with your happy and hospitable people, to visit this beautiful corner of our continent and to hold discussion with my dear friends, colleagues, and Heads of Government of the Caribbean community.

—————————

Which of the Heads of State that will be at Los Cabos will in effect continue to Rio? Will there be last minute changes?

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on May 11th, 2012
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

From:

Sustainable Energy Policy & Practice is published in cooperation with the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) and with funding from the United Arab Emirates Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Directorate of Energy and Climate Change)

==============================

and as reported by the IISD Conference Recording Organization:

SE4ALL Publishes Global Action Agenda to Encourage Concerted Action on Sustainable Energy for All
Read More: SE4ALL Publishes Global Action Agenda to Encourage Concerted Action on Sustainable Energy for All

25_April_2012: UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon’s Sustainable Energy for All (SE4ALL) Initiative has published an Action Agenda, containing summaries of key action areas to realize SE4ALL and an implementation roadmap to begin working towards that goal.

The document, titled “Sustainable Energy for All: A Global Action Agenda – Pathways for Concerted Action toward Sustainable Energy for All,” begins by identifying 11 high-impact “Action Areas” that can be leveraged to create and support an environment for widespread deployment of sustainable energy globally. These areas include seven sectors: 1) modern cooking appliances and fuels; 2) distributed electricity solutions; 3) grid infrastructure and supply efficiency; 4) large-scale renewable power; 5) industrial and agricultural processes; 6) transportation; and 7) buildings and appliances. It also includes four enabling action areas: 1) energy planning and policies; 2) business model and technology innovation; 3) finance and risk management; and 4) capacity building and knowledge sharing.

The Action Agenda continues with a chapter focused around an illustrative roadmap table for beginning work on the Action Areas. The table includes progress needed immediately (by the UN Conference on Sustainable Development- UNCSD, or Rio+20), in the short term (by 2015), and in the long term (2015-2030) at the country level in both developing and developed countries, at the sectoral level, and on enabling conditions to allow progress at these levels to begin. The document continues and concludes with a chapter on mobilizing action, outlining specific high-impact opportunities in each Action Area.

The Action Agenda was launched at the Clean Energy Ministerial, which took place on 25-26 April in London, UK.

The SE4ALL initiative is part of the UN’s International Year for Sustainable Energy for All, and has three main objectives: ensuring universal access to modern energy services; doubling the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency; doubling the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix. [Publication:

Sustainable Energy for All: A Global Action Agenda – Pathways for Concerted Action toward Sustainable Energy for All] [IISD RS Story on New Clean Energy Initiatives and Commitments Announced at CEM3]

———————————————————————–


and from the most outspoken Clean Energy advocates from among the G77 – The Small Island Independent States:t

SIDS High-Level Conference on SE4ALL Adopts Barbados Declaration
Read More: SIDS High-Level Conference on SE4ALL Adopts Barbados Declaration

9 May 2012:

On the second day of the SIDS High-Level Conference on Sustainable Development for All (SE4ALL), which convened in Bridgetown, Barbados, from 7-8 May 2012, delegates from the three SIDS regions – the Pacific, Caribbean and Atlantic, Indian Ocean, Mediterranean, and South China Sea  (AIMS) – unanimously adopted the Barbados Declaration, which will be taken to the Rio+20 Conference in June.

The Barbados Declaration addresses challenges, opportunities, commitments and initiatives on sustainable energy in SIDS and the Rio+20 Conference, and includes an Annex of voluntary commitments by SIDS.

On Challenges, the Declaration notes that SIDS remain highly vulnerable, notably due to their small open economies, narrow resource base, disadvantages in economies of scale, remoteness, high export concentration, high dependency on imports with high vulnerability to energy and food price shocks, and relatively high levels of national debt.

On Opportunities, the Declaration emphasizes the availability of commercially feasible options for providing energy, such as wind, solar, geothermal and ocean energy, and that many SIDS are particularly suited to these options because of their geographical location. However, it notes that these technologies must be made accessible, affordable and adaptable to the needs and particular circumstances of SIDS communities.

On Commitments, the Declaration affirms the commitment by SIDS to work towards continued development and implementation of policies and plans to ensure the transformation of the current fossil fuel based energy sector to a modern, affordable and efficient renewable energy sector.

On Initiatives, the Declaration acknowledged and welcomed the work of SIDS DOCK, which is a sustainable energy initiative of SIDS in collaboration with the UNDP, World Bank, and donors. The Declaration also acknowledges the role of of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in supporting SIDS in their efforts to accelerate renewable energy deployment, calls for its greater involvement in supporting SIDS’ efforts, and encourages SIDS that have not joined IRENA to consider doing so.

On the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (UNCSD, or Rio+20), the Declaration reiterates that the outcomes of the meeting must be ambitious and reflect the needs of SIDS.

The Annex contains voluntary commitments by 19 SIDS: Barbados, Cape Verde, Cook Islands, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guyana, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Nauru, Palau, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Seychelles, Timor Leste, Tonga, and Tuvalu. The commitments include Barbados’ announcement of its plan to increase the share of renewable energy in Barbados to 29% of all electricity consumption by 2029. Maldives committed to achieve carbon neutrality in the energy sector by year 2020. Marshall Islands pledged to electrify all urban households and 95% of rural outer atoll households by 2015. Mauritius committed to increasing the share of renewable energy – including solar power, wind energy, hydroelectric power, bagasse and landfill gas – to 35% or more by 2025. And Seychelles committed to produce 15% of its energy supply from renewable energy by 2030. The Annex will remain open for further inscriptions until 25 May.

The Conference was organised by UNDP in partnership with the Government of Barbados, SIDS DOCK, the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, British High Commission Bridgetown, Archers Hall, Australian Aid and the United Nations Foundation.

[Barbados Declaration] [Meeting Website][IISD RS coverage of the meeting]

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on April 24th, 2012
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)



In www.sustainabilitank.info  we wrote about the Friday, April 20, 2012, International Development Law Organization (IDLO)/ Centre for International Sustainable Development Law (CISDL) joint event with the Division for Sustainable Development (DSD) of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) on the topic:

“THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF LAW TO THE RIO+20 AGENDA”

we have here the opening presentation by Ms. Elizabeth (Liz) Thompson, Assistant Secretary-General of the UN, and Executive Coordinator of the UN Conference on Sustainable Development – the so called RIO+20 June 2012 event being prepared right now in meetings at the UN headquarters in New York.

Ms. Thompson was a practicing attorney as well as a journalist. She was a lecturer in ecology, economy, energy and politics. She has degrees from the University of the West Indies, an MBA from the University of Liverpool and a Master of Law From Robert Gordon University of Scotland. She held Ministerial positions in Energy and Environment.


PROTOCOL: Philosophers and scholars of jurisprudence posit that law is a prerequisite for the regulation of a society, for the definition and underpinning of bounds of acceptable behaviour, for establishing certainty in commercial relationships and for the organisation of social and economic activity – particularly in regulating relations amongst citizens, between companies, and even between countries.

It is interesting to observe that when cynics say that nothing comes out of mega-conferences, the contribution of conference such as the Earth Summit of 1992 to a consequential body of legal principles is largely ignored. They also take for granted the multiple benefits and rights which are bestowed on societies as a result of the dialogue, negotiations and consequential global and national activities, including new legal frameworks.

  • The United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), of 1992, was the catalyst and anchor for the creation of a body of law which bestowed broad political legitimacy on the concept of sustainable development, as elaborated in a detailed blueprint, Agenda 21.
  • Rio 92 became the platform from which was launched tracks of hard law in the form of international conventions such as – UNFCCC, UNCBD, UNFCD, and was the culmination of a fertile period of law-making and for providing the backdrop for the adoption of the Statement of Forest Principles. It also became the ultimate font of the creation and enactment into national legislation globally, of some of the Principles agreed at Rio. Finally, the Conference became the source for streams of soft law which enlarge our understanding of and the efficacy of national and international legal systems (although there is debate over the role of soft law in international law).

  • The Rio Summit Declaration gave expression to foundational principles of international environmental law, some of which have also been replicated in national laws. Some of the foundational principles to which I refer include:

§       The “no-harm” principle (Principle 2) stating States have the sovereign right to exploit their natural resources provided that in doing so they do “not cause damage to the environment of other States or of areas beyond the limits of national jurisdiction.”

§       the “right to development” (Principle 3)

§       the precautionary approach (Principle 15), codified in various treaties and discussed in various international cases and journals

§       the principle of “common but differentiated responsibilities” (Principle 7)

§       the “polluter pays principle” (Principle 16)

Since Rio a great deal of progress has been made in setting goals and targets, and the forging of partnerships in the field of sustainable development. Despite this clear progress, the sheer scale and acceleration of global problems – climate change, biodiversity loss, fisheries and oceans, food insecurity – lead to the conclusion that our efforts since Rio 92 need to be strengthened and that in so far as law contributes to development, then the enhancement of legal mechanisms which could secure and accelerate the process and progress of sustainable development, must be undertaken.

Against this background, I seek to pose two questions – What could Rio+20 contribute to the law and development nexus? Should Rio+20 initiate a new round of normative innovation?

Sustainable development is predicated on integrated policy-making and implementation.  Let us recall that Rio Principle 4 provides that: “In order to achieve sustainable development, environmental protection shall constitute an integral part of the development process and cannot be considered in isolation from it.”   Hence, in my view, in legal and policy terms, success in Rio+20 will rest primarily on taking integration of the three pillars of sustainable development seriously at the national, regional and international levels, as well as dedicating ourselves to the implementation of both existing commitments and those which might be birthed at Rio+20. It will also rest on whether we can develop new and effective international frameworks to deal with water, energy, food security, oceans and their resources, living and non living, as some of the critical development challenges with which humanity is faced.

  • At least one law association is already addressing this issue of the integration of SD. The International Law Association’s New Delhi Declaration states: “The principle of integration reflects the interdependence of social, economic, financial, environmental and human rights aspects of principles and rules of international law relating to sustainable development as well as of the interdependence of the needs of current and future generations of humankind.”[1]

  • National Sustainable Development Councils and Commissions have also played pivotal roles in the integration of the three pillars at the domestic level. However, like much actual implementation, integrated policy-making and service delivery is not easy work. It is not easy because it requires us to break out of policy silos and depart from familiar ways of doing business. Sustainable development done right constitutes what management specialists refer to as disruptive change. Such change is disruptive of the status quo. And many of us fear that kind of change, even when it is beneficial.

  • Going forward, we need strong national institutions and mechanisms that foster and facilitate integrated policy-making. Examples of good practice exist, such as integrated water resources management (IWRM) and integrated coastal zone management. Framework legislation can be used to anchor key sustainable development principles, e.g. in the South African National Environment Management Act, setting the stage for mainstreaming in more detailed legislation and regulation, as well as empowering the judiciary to draw on relevant principles for the purposes of interpretation.

———-

In any discussion of SD and the possible outcomes of the Rio process, we must also consider that the ubiquitous nature of technology has made it a powerful driver of innovation, new business, economic activity and knowledge but it has also spawned new forms of criminal activity, and a divide in how we define the “haves and “have nots” at both the level of the citizen and country. Perhaps some new body of legislation which will address these difficulties and help to bridge this technology divide and facilitate access might be considered.


  • Other potential jurisprudential Rio outcomes of hard or soft law could be the beginning or introduction of a new matrix for measuring sustainability which has been referred to as GDP+, or what some refer to as a Sustainable Development Index, as well as action on the calls for the possible consideration of a convention or consensus of business actors in relation to including principles of sustainability in their operating ethic. Rio+20 will very likely decide on principles and a process to define a set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These could knit together the panoply of international sustainable development commitments and targets into an action-oriented framework, with well defined targets and time lines. The universal nature of the SDGs would serve to underscore the comprehensive nature of the commitment of all countries to sustainable development.


  • It is still unclear as to how Rio+20 will influence the international governance structures for SD. Reform and strengthening of the institutional framework is firmly on the agenda in respect of the broader issue of sustainable development governance, as well as the narrower issue of international environmental governance, together with a perspective on enlarged international governance through the crafting of new institutions to oversee the instruments and processes of hard law. What matters more, perhaps, than the details of any specific proposal is that the institutions which evolve from the Rio+20process should be effective in fulfilling key functions, especially in fostering coherence and coordinated action. Post-Rio the international sustainable development institutions must be effective in agenda-setting and responding to emerging issues. It should be however, noted that even with elaboration, the international architecture cannot properly function in isolation of national structures. Hence attention must also be paid to the manner in which national and regional institutions will synergise with the international structures.

In the context of the transition to a global green economy with the objective of achieving sustainable development and eradicating poverty, part of the dialogue will clearly revolve around countries’ concern that the formulation of legal regimes arising from Rio+20 cannot be protectionist, must be equitable and transparent, must not exacerbate the trade and development divide between North and South and indeed between South and South and must make trade markets more accessible to developing countries particularly the smaller more vulnerable nation-states which have little trade and export capacity, and which because of their size and peculiar socio-economic characteristics and vulnerability, now have, and will continue to have miniscule shares of the international trade market.

In adopting their nationally-defined green economy policies, countries will be faced with questions such as how to craft policies that promote “greener” ways of doing business, while simultaneously advancing social goals such as job creation and gender equity. Governments will also have to develop national legal and regulatory frameworks which will enable and give rise to the investment necessary to construct national green economies. In this regard, it will be interesting to see how the law can contribute to this process by being used as a tool for social, economic and environmental engineering.

Finally, let us turn to another key conference objective and pose the question – what are some emerging legal themes and issues of sustainable development? In the legal development dialogue there is increased frequency in references to the rule of law, accountability, and access to justice as legal principles contributing to sustainable development. Voices are also rising in a caution to safeguard against the erosion of sound and established legal principles; these are finding mention in the concept of non-regression.

Law is the instrument by which we obtain justice. It is of critical importance in protecting people and planet, fostering prosperity and promoting peace in national and global societies. In addition, with globalisation and the shrinking of global physical and market spaces as a result of technology, the role and rule of law in sustainable development assume even greater importance. Professor Michael J Sandel in his work “Justice: What’s the Right Thing To Do,” writes – “To ask whether a society is just is to ask how it distributes the things we prize – income and wealth, duties and rights, powers and opportunities, offices and honours. A just society distributes these goods in the right way; it gives each person his or her due.” Rio+20 is fundamentally a conference on global justice for the planet and all people who live on it; and supporting bodies of hard and soft law which give effect to that justice must be one of the outcomes of Rio+20 in helping us to achieve ”the future we want.” .



[1] International Law Association, ILA New Delhi Declaration of Principles of International Law Relating to Sustainable Development, 2 April 2002. See also, Commission on Environmental Law of IUCN and International Council on Environmental Law, Draft International Covenant on Environment and Development, art. 13.

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on August 20th, 2010
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

erom: CCRIF <pr@ccrif.org>
date Thu, Aug 19, 2010
subject Caribbean Economics of Climate Adaptation Study results released.

Please see attached press release regarding the publication of preliminary results of the study on the Economics of Climate Adaptation (ECA) in the Caribbean implemented by the Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility and regional partners.

The results for eight pilot countries (Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, Dominica, Jamaica, and St. Lucia) are presented in a short brochure entitled, Enhancing the climate risk and adaptation fact base for the Caribbean (Preliminary Results).

The brochure is available on the CCRIF website at www.ccrif.org/sites/default/files/publications/ECABrochureFinalAugust182010.pdf

Regards,
Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility (CCRIF)

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on July 16th, 2010
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

Assistant Secretary of Energy for Policy & International Affairs David Sandalow.

TOPIC:              Upcoming Clean Energy Ministerial July 19-20th

This is written on the basis of a US Department of State Press Conference  – Thursday, July 15, 2010.

————

This article follows our posting of July 14, 2010:

The Major 17 Economies were joined by Bangladesh, Denmark, Barbados, Ethiopia, Singapore and the UAE at the recent Rome meeting – to be followed by a July 19-20, 2010 Washington DC Meeting on Clean Energy – all this to build a program for Cancun.  Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on July 14th, 2010 by Pincas Jawetz ( PJ at SustainabiliTank.com)

We said at the time that the July 19 – 20, 2010  Washington DC Ministerial meeting will be a sequel – now we are convonced that is actually a different kind of meeting and I do not think that its eyes will be towards Cancun.

———–

The Department of Energy’s Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs, David Sandalow, gave a background briefing and answered questions on the web regarding the importance of the upcoming Washington DC – Clean Energy Ministerial meeting. He discussed Energy Secretary Chu’s hopes on what will be accomplished.

The following countries will be represented:  Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, the European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Italy, Korea, Japan, Mexico, Norway, the Russian Federation, Spain, South Africa, Sweden, the U.A.E. and the U.K.

This list excludes Indonesia from the Major Economies Forum which are 16 + The EU and then at their Rome meeting of June 30 – July 1, 2010, added on Ministers from a variety of representative smaller economies: Bangladesh, Denmark, Barbados, Ethiopia, Singapore, UAE.

This list includes in addition to the EU also all The Scandinavian States: Denmark, Norway, Spain and Sweden. As well it includes Belgium and Spain. It does not include Bangladesh, Barbados, Ethiopia, Singapore which were part of the meeting of June 30 – July 1, 2010 but it does include from that meeting Denmark that was a participant because of its hosting the Copenhagen meeting, and the UAE that seemingly represents the oil exporting countries.

The Washington meeting includes also Belgium because by now they have become the half year Presidents of the EU for July 1 till  December 31, 2010, and it retains Spain that held this position during the first half of 2010. To top this there is also an actual EU delegation at the table besides the temporary Presidents. We assume that this delegation is there because Malta, Cyprus and other EU delegations are not there. Place was also found for all major four Scandinavian Countries – Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden – surely nice people all of them.

I write all of this in order to say that some better way has to be found on how to treat the EU and the World, when the Obama Administration wants indeed to show that it is serious about climate change by inviting just the large emitters that total 80% of the global emissions, or, if intent to bring in also some small representation of the small countries, that do not have substantial emissions, but proportionately are going to bear a major part of the suffering, the Rome initiative of having present also Bangladesh, Barbados and Ethiopia would have been just fine – and the total figure would have been then 16 + 1 (the EU) + 3 (this for Bangladesh, Barbados, Ethiopia) and it obviously would have included as part of the 16 also Indonesia.

For more information, the link to the website is:   cleanenergyministerial.org/

——————-

At question time I asked from Mr. Sandalow why is Indonesia not at the meeting, and why was the symbolic, but important participation of the small number of really very small economies dropped?

The answer was that Indonesia said they are not coming because they participate at that time at a South  Asia meeting. The fact that the small economies were dropped is “because this is for the large energy markets – for 80% of the ENERGY MARKET  and not for the whole world.”  THE IDEA IS COME UP WITH ACTIONS TO PROMOTE CLEAN ENERGY, he said.

It would have been easier to accept that answer had the US also kept out the additional 6 EU States that were not among the original 16 + EU. We also would like to ask why UAE – though we think that they clearly are a better choice then Saudi Arabia – but still not exactly your ideal partner when you try to disengage from oil even though they do in effect – as holders of serious financial reserves – also participate in the financial benefits from looking for a cleaner future.

The above, because after Copenhagen we hoped for the involvement of business interests in order to create the working alternative to the Kyoto process – the interest of business in going green. For this to be effective one must have at the table mainly the real big emitters who indeed coincide with the biggest economies.

We thought that amounted to the maximum of 16 and – under EU conditions – just one more chair for the EU. Now there will be 23 chairs at the Washington table. The higher number decreasing the chance for success.

Monday, July 19, 2010 at 9am there will be an open press conference when the meeting starts.

###

Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on July 10th, 2010
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility (CCRIF) hosts Regional Workshop on Economics of Climate Adaptation.

CCRIF has recently launched a project to produce a quantitative knowledge base for key climate change risks and adaptation strategies for decision making across the region, building on and contributing to the Review of the Economics of Climate Change (RECC) process. Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility (CCRIF) hosts RegionalWorkshop on Economics of Climate Adaptation On 12 and 13 May, over 50 representatives from Caribbean governments and international agencies met in Barbados to discuss the initial results from a recent investigation into the Economics of Climate Adaptation (ECA) in the Caribbean. This study, part of CCRIF’s technical assistance programme, will enhance the development of a fact base for developing sound climate change adaptation strategies in the region.

Since the launch of the project in February, a team composed of Caribbean Risk Managers on behalf of CCRIF, the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (5C’s) and other regional partners, has been intensely involved in data collection and

analysis for a number of countries with analytical support provided by McKinsey & Company and Swiss Re. The workshop, which was held at the Caribbean Development Bank, provided an introduction to the Economics of Climate Adaptation approach and its application in the Caribbean and focussed on sharing the findings of the study with the participants examining the key insights and results for wind, sea level rise/coastal flooding, inland flooding and salinisation of groundwater.

The final outputs of this study will include a risk baseline which will provide transparency about current and future expected
losses from climate risks under three climate change scenarios; and assessment of adaptation measures – identification of feasible and applicable measures to adapt to the expected risks based on quantitative analysis of total cost and expected benefits of risk mitigation and transfer measures.

The results of the study will assist decision makers throughout the Caribbean region in defining and developing sound adaptation strategies and business cases which can be incorporated into national development plans. The recent Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen reconfirmed the commitment to provide funding and technical assistance for climate adaptation
to developing countries. The ECA study will help Caribbean leaders develop programmes that will be strong candidates for adaptation assistance.

The innovation of the ECA methodology lies in its positioning across different knowledge sectors, spanning climate science, the financial industry and economic research. The analysis is based on joining four main elements:
1. Climate change scenarios based on the most recent available scientific evidence.
2. Hazard models forecasting the occurrence of hurricanes or other damaging events.
3. Economic damage functions linking the intensity of events to economic impact.
4. Value distribution models describing each country’s economic and population exposure to hazards in a granular, precise way.

Hurricanes can be dangerous, listening to the hurricane warning messages and planning ahead can reduce the chances of injury or major property damage.
BEFORE:
Know your Emergency Shelters Contact the National Disaster Office for the closest shelters. Have disaster supplies on hand
Flashlight and extra batteries; Portable, battery-operated radio and extra batteries; First aid kit; Non-perishable (canned food) and water; Non-electric can opener; Essential medicines; Cash and
credit cards; Sturdy shoes Protect your windows: Permanent shutters are the best protection. A lower-cost approach is to put up
plywood panels. Trim back branches from trees: Trim branches away from your home and cut all dead or weak branches
on any trees on your property.

Check into your Home and Auto Insurance: Confirm that policies are valid and coverage is appropriate.

Make arrangements for pets and livestock: Pets may not be allowed into emergency shelters for health and space reasons. Contact your local humane society for information on animal shelters.

Develop an emergency communication plan: Make sure that all family members know what to do. Teach family members how and when to turn off gas, electricity, and water. Teach children how and when to call police or fire department and which radio station to tune to for emergency information.

Hurricane Watches and Warnings:
A hurricane watch is issued when there is a threat of hurricane conditions within 24-36 hours. A hurricane warning is issued when hurricane conditions (winds of 74 miles per hour or greater, or dangerously high water and rough seas) are expected in 24 hours or less.

DURING A HURRICANE WATCH:
Listen to the radio or television for hurricane progress reports
Check emergency supplies
Fuel car
Bring in outdoor objects such as lawn furniture, toys, and garden tools and anchor objects that cannot
be brought inside
Secure buildings by closing and boarding up windows
Remove outside antennas and satellite dishes
Turn refrigerator and freezer to coldest settings. Open only when absolutely necessary and close
quickly
Store drinking water in clean jugs, bottles, and cooking utensils.

DURING A HURRICANE WARNING:
If you need to evacuate your home, lock up home and go to the nearest shelter
Take blankets and sleeping bags to shelter
Listen constantly to a radio or television for official instructions
Store valuables and personal papers in a waterproof container on the highest level of your home
Stay inside, away from windows, skylights, and glass doors
Keep a supply of flashlights and extra batteries handy
Avoid open flames, such as candles and kerosene lamps, as a source of light
If power is lost, turn off major appliances to reduce power “surge” when electricity is restored.

###

Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on July 5th, 2010
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

We have received the following Earth Conscious Magazine File from our UNEP – Caribbean Contacts and thought this is a worthwhile Magazine that will be liked by our readers. This posting is intended so that we transmit the link to the Magazine File.

Sent by: hutchlin@gmail.com
File
Earth Conscious June 2010.pdf

Link to file:
rcpt.yousendit.com/903504945/9e68dae5dc1dc2a6b88e47bfdd9b433a
File too big for email? Try at www.yousendit.com


EARTH CONSCIOUS MAGAZINE

Editor: Linda Hutchinson-Jafar


Contributors:
Bogusia Sipiora
Garfield King
Barbara King
Mark Meredith
Jordan Jafar
Danielle Nierenberg
Ramanathan Menon


Design and layout:
Karibgraphics Ltd.

is published by:
Caribbean PR Agency
#268 Harold Fraser Circular, Valsayn, Trinidad and Tobago, W.I.
T/F: (868) 645-0368

prservices@caribbeanpragency.com
www.caribbeanpragency.com
www.earthconsciousmagazine.com




###

Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on June 13th, 2010
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

Probe at UN climate talks after Saudi sign smashed

Saturday, 12 June 2010 10:06
author:Reuters
POLITICS & ECONOMICS / NEWS
by Reuters, Saturday, 12 June 2010

SAUDI STANCE: Saudi angered many by blocking study of global  warming. (Getty Images)

SAUDI STANCE: Saudi angered many by blocking study of global warming. (Getty Images)

UN climate negotiators agreed to an investigation on Friday after protesters smashed a sign emblazoned “Saudi Arabia” and dropped it in toilet after Riyadh blocked a study of deeper cuts in greenhouse gases.

Many countries condemned the protest, after Saudi Arabia blocked a request by small island states at the May 31-June 11 talks for a study of tougher cuts in greenhouse gases to help slow a rise in world sea levels.


Mexico’s delegate Luis Alfonso de Alba, whose country will host the main climate talks in late 2010, said he was initiating an investigation by the U.N. Climate Change Secretariat.

Pieces of the smashed Saudi Arabia sign – about 30 cm and placed on a table to identify the delegation during negotiations – were dropped in a toilet and then photographed, delegates said. The pictures were then put up on some walls.

“This is a serious incident. We should fully support that the secretariat should carry out an investigation and the result should be informed to the parties,” Chinese delegate Su Wei said.

Lebanon’s delegate also said that the Saudi flag was abused during a protest in the conference hall after Saudi Arabia blocked the small island state’s push.

Saudi Arabia has often expressed worries at U.N. climate negotiations that a shift towards renewable energies will undermine its oil export earnings.

It opposed the small island state’s push for a study of limiting global warming, saying that wider issues such as the impact on exporters, also had to be taken into account.

———————————-

Sabotage to blame for World Cup fiasco – Al Jazeera.

by Andy Sambidge, ArabianBusiness.com, Friday, 11 June 2010

 www.arabianbusiness.com/590311-te…

 www.arabianbusiness.com/590345-al…

Al Jazeera Sport, which suffered major technical problems during its broadcast of the FIFA World Cup to Middle East viewers, has blamed “a deliberate act of sabotage”.

Its exclusive coverage of the South Africa versus Mexico match on Friday was hit by regular transmission problems with fan across the region unable to enjoy the spectacle.

“Al Jazeera Sport would like to condemn the actions of those involved in the deliberate attempts to block its signal during its World Cup broadcasts yesterday,” Al Jazeera Sport said in a statement published by media in Qatar on Saturday.

“Despite its considerable efforts to bring the best coverage to the most possible fans across the Middle East and North Africa including 18 free-to-air games from the group stages, Al Jazeera Sport viewers repeatedly lost their signal through the course of yesterday’s opening fixture,” the statement added.

“This loss of signal was completely beyond Al Jazeera Sport’s control and they share in the frustrations of all those whose enjoyment was spoiled by what was a deliberate act of sabotage.”


Football fans across the Middle East cried foul on Friday as the start of Al Jazeera’s broadcast of the FIFA World Cup was hit by blank screens. Fans across Dubai, including thousands watching at special events across the emirate, reported technical problems.

Hundreds of fans also complained about the problems on Twitter.

Technical problems hit the beginning of the coverage by the Qatar based TV station with its special World Cup channels frozen or broadcasting in the wrong language in a number of countries, including the UAE, Bahrain, Kuwait and Egypt.

For most of the first half an hour of the first game between hosts South Africa and Mexico, viewers were left with no picture or a frozen screen.

The issues appeared to have been sorted out shortly before half time but problems persisted throughout the second half of the match.

Broadcasts on the English language channel morphed into French commentary from the start and then the channel went blank. The English commentary only appeared much later in the first half of the game.

The only coverage working throughout was the HD channel broadcasting in Arabic only.

Broadcasting rights across the region are owned by Al Jazeera Sport, and can currently be accessed either by purchasing an Al Jazeera Sports card or through Etisalat’s pay TV E-Vision.

————————

Al Jazeera has ‘FIFA backing’ to tackle World Cup woes

by Andy Sambidge, Saturday, 12 June 2010, ArabianBusiness.com

BACKUP PLAN: Al Jazeera Sport has implemented its contingency plan  to minimise future World Cup disruption which has been blamed on  saboteurs. (Getty Images)
BACKUP PLAN: Al Jazeera Sport has implemented its contingency plan to minimise future World Cup disruption which has been blamed on saboteurs. (Getty Images)

The general manager of Al Jazeera Sport said on Saturday that the company had implemented a “back up plan” to minimise future disruption to its FIFA World Cup coverage, adding that it had the full backing of FIFA to tackle the problem.

Nasser Al Khelaifi told Arabian Business in a telephone interview that the people responsible for “destroying our signal” would be found “very soon”.

However, later on Saturday, the broadcaster experienced further technical problems, notably during the Argentina v Nigeria match, as protests mounted up on social networking sites such as Twitter and Facebook.

Al Khelaifi said that the TV station had the “full backing” of World Cup organisers FIFA to find the culprits he accused of deliberately jammed the Nilesat and Arabsat satellites.

In a statement, FIFA said: “FIFA is supporting Al Jazeera in trying to locate the source of the interference in the broadcast of the 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa. FIFA is appalled by any action to try to stop Al Jazeera’s authorised transmissions of the FIFA World Cup as such actions deprive football fans from enjoying the world game in the region. It is not acceptable to FIFA.”

Al Jazeera Sport suffered major technical problems during its broadcast of the opening World Cup match between South Africa versus Mexico on Friday.

Al Khelaifi said: “The people who were responsible did not steal the TV rights of Al Jazeera yesterday, they stole the viewers’ rights because this was a match that was being broadcast free to everyone. Of course we have been in contact with FIFA and they are supporting us to find them [the people responsible].”

He added that Al Jazeera was working with “a number of international specialised companies” to track down the culprits and that he was confident they would be found soon.

In a statement released earlier, the TV company said: “Al Jazeera Sport would like to condemn the actions of those involved in the deliberate attempts to block its signal during its World Cup broadcasts yesterday”, adding that it was a “deliberate act of sabotage”.

Al Khelaifi told Arabian Business that its contingency plan to minimise future disruption was now in operation but added that he could not say if future satellite attacks would happen during the football tournament.

“I think these people are sick,” he said, adding that everything was being done to ensure the best possible TV coverage for the rest of the tournament.

Technical problems hit the beginning of the coverage by the Qatar based TV station with its special World Cup channels frozen or broadcasting in the wrong language in a number of countries across the Middle East.

For most of the first half an hour of the first game between hosts South Africa and Mexico, viewers were left with no picture or a frozen screen.

The issues appeared to have been sorted out shortly before half time but problems persisted throughout the second half of the match.

The second match of the night – France v Uruguay – was unaffected.

Al Khelaifi could not put a figure on how many viewers were affected by the disruption on Friday but said that 85m people had tuned in for Al Jazeera’s coverage of the Champions League Final last month.

Broadcasting rights across the region are exclusively owned by Al Jazeera Sport

###

Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on May 24th, 2010
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

UNEP leads 27 countries of the Wider Caribbean on  “land-based pollution” at an International Maritime Organization (IMO) meeting in Panama City based on the ISTAC of Kingston, Jamaica (Interim Scientific, Technical and Advisory Committee to the Cartagena Convention. Will they touch nevertheless the menacing Deep-Water Oil-Well Blow-Out?

from: James Sniffen <sniffenj@un.org>

UNEP/CEP PRESS RELEASE: REGIONAL GOVERNMENT POLLUTION EXPERTS MEET IN PANAMA.

Panama City, 24th May, 2010:

Over 50 pollution control experts from 27 countries of the Wider Caribbean
gather today (Monday 24th May) in Panama City at the invitation of the
United Nations Environment Programme’s Caribbean Environment Programme
(UNEP CEP) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

The gathering of experts for the 5th Meeting of the Interim Scientific, Technical and Advisory Committee (ISTAC) to the Protocol concerning pollution from land-based sources, commonly known as the LBS Protocol, will last for five days.  The CEP is the Secretariat for this Protocol and is based in Kingston, Jamaica.

The LBS Protocol is one of three agreements under the Convention for the
Protection and Development of the Marine Environment in the Wider Caribbean
Region (the Cartagena Convention).  It establishes regional guidelines and
standards for reducing the impact of pollution on the coastal and marine
environment, and on human health.   Over 80% of the pollution of the marine
environment of the Wider Caribbean is estimated to originate from land
based sources and activities.

Panama, the host country, is one of only six countries to have ratified the LBS Protocol.  The others are Trinidad and Tobago, Belize, Saint Lucia, France and the United States.  Discussions during the meeting will focus on measures to increase the region’s commitment to ratify the Protocol, and have it enter into force and become international law as soon as possible.

In support of regional cooperation, UNEP CEP is partnering with the IMO and their joint Regional Activity Centre for Oil Spills (RAC REMPEITC) to bring together experts from environmental agencies, maritime authorities and port administrations for this 5th LBS ISTAC.

Delegates are expected to identify practical measures to improve the implementation of marine environmental agreements including the IMO London Convention on the control of pollution from dumping of wastes at sea and the MARPOL Convention on the prevention of pollution of the marine environment by ships.

According to Nelson Andrade, Coordinator of UNEP CEP”   “It is vital that
Governments adopt a more integrated approach to reducing pollution from
land and marine based sources”.  He noted that the continued partnership
between UNEP and IMO will help to effectively implement the Cartagena
Convention and its three Protocols and to reduce marine contamination.

Meeting Participants are also expected to review recent achievements of the
UNEP CEP to reduce and control marine pollution and to endorse a new work
plan and budget for 2010-2011.

For additional information, please contact:

Christopher Corbin,Programme Officer,
Assessment and Management of Environment Pollution (AMEP),
Regional Co-ordinating Unit, UNEP CEP
Kingston, Jamaica
Telephone: (876) 922-9267 — Fax: (876) 922-9292
www.cep.unep.org; cjc@cep.unep.org;

About UNEP’s Caribbean Environment Programme (CEP) –  The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) established the Caribbean Environment Programme (CEP) in 1976 under the framework of its Regional Seas Programme.   It was based on the importance and value of the Wider Caribbean Region’s fragile and vulnerable coastal and marine ecosystems including an abundant and mainly endemic flora and fauna,

A Caribbean Action Plan was adopted by the Caribbean countries and led to the adoption, in 1983, of the only current regional, legally-binding agreement for the protection of the marine environment, the Cartagena Convention.  The Convention and its first Protocol (Oil Spill) entered into force in 1986.

Two other protocols were developed by the region – the Protocols on Special Protected Areas and Wildlife (SPAW) and the Control of Pollution from Land Based Sources (LBS) in 1990 and 1999 respectively.

The SPAW Protocol entered into force in 2000, whereas three ratifying countries are still needed for the LBS Protocol.

The Caribbean Regional Coordinating Unit (UNEP-CAR/RCU) serves as the Secretariat to the Cartagena Convention and is based in Kingston, Jamaica.

Each Protocol is served by a Regional Activity Centre.  These Centres are
based in the Netherlands Antilles (Regional Marine Pollution Emergency
Information and Training Center for the Wider Caribbean, RAC/REMPEITC) for
the Oil Spills Protocol, Guadeloupe (RAC/SPAW) for the SPAW Protocol, Cuba
(Centre of Engineering and Environmental Management of Coasts and Bays) and
Trinidad & Tobago (Institute of Marine Affairs) for the LBS Protocol.

*****
Jim Sniffen
Programme Officer
UN Environment Programme
New York
tel: +1-212-963-8094/8210
info@nyo.unep.org
www.nyo.unep.org

###

Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on April 21st, 2010
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

The following is a letter of recommendation for Senator Elizabeth H. Thompson in her application for the job of Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC that we received from India and we were asked to forward it to the UN Secretary, Mr. Ban Ki-moon.

We followed up by sending it to his spokesman – Mr Nesirky.

Dear Mr. Nesirky,
Spokesperson for the UN Secretary-General

I just received to our Media outlet the following letter from SEEM,
India and its Energy and Environment outlet. As I was asked to forward
the attached to the attention of the Secretary-General, it occurred to
me that the best way to do this would be to pass it on through you. I
think this would be completely appropriate.

Sincerely yours,
Pincas Jawetz
Editor, and correspondent covering the UN,
The Sustainable Development outlet – www.SustainabiliTank.info

As our contact from India suggested, we are also posting the letter on our website:


————————–

image

Mr. Ban Ki-moon

Secretary General                                                                       April 17, 2010, INDIA

United Nations Secretariat
New York, NY 10017, USA

Honorable Secretary General Ban Ki-moon:

It gives us immense pleasure to learn that the Government of Barbados have nominated Senator Elizabeth H. Thompson to contest for the post of Executive Secretary of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

This good news has been well received by our publication ‘energy manager’ as well as its publishers The Society of Energy Engineers and Managers (SEEM) from India.

In the last leg of April 2008, I read an important news ‘Winners of UNEP Champions of the Earth Awards 2008 Call for Urgent Action on Climate Change – Catalysts for the Global Green Economy Honored at Gala Evening in Singapore Singapore/Nairobi, 22 April 2008 – Seven leading lights in the battle against global warming who are also catalyzing the transition to a greener and cleaner global economy were today acknowledged as the 2008 Champions of the Earth.

Within minutes I sent out our invitation on email to all the seven winners to send us their good wishes to our July 2008 issue commemorating ‘The Year of Planet Earth’. But only one winner, Senator Thompson had the courtesy, heart and the attitude to send us a thought-provoking message. Since then she was kind enough to contribute article and also act as the Guest Editor of our October 2008 issue. And, Senator Thompson has maintained that good relations with us until today, despite her time constraints.

What is amazing is not only Senator Thompson’s devotion towards the subjects of climate change, energy conservation, energy efficiency and renewable energy sources, but also the excellent spirit she has always exhibited by sharing her wide knowledge with publications like ours in India with 1.3 billion people.

Let me quote a tiny paragraph that I had read and preserved from a news report during April 2008: “Liz Thompson, the winner for Latin America and the Caribbean whose many achievements include inspiring and pioneering a response to a major challenge for small island developing states-improved solid waste management-said: “You go to work every day and do something you are passionate about. But do not think anyone is taking notice at this level“.  It really reflects Senator Thompson down-to-earth attitude and simplicity.

We, from India, most sincerely recommend her nomination to the post of Executive Secretary as she will be an asset to UNFCC. We wish Senator Thompson whole heartedly all success in her pursuit to become the next Executive Secretary of UNFCCC.

Before concluding, we also wish to record our great appreciation towards your dynamic leadership in running the UN Council most successfully. Also, we wish best of luck to outgoing Executive Secretary Yvo de Boer.

With best regards,

Sincerely,

image
M.R.Menon

Sub-Editor

image image

###

Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on April 14th, 2010
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

===========

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Isada Chambers
Date: Tue, Apr 13, 2010 at 9:32 AM
Subject: Re: Barbados’ Candidate for UNFCCC

Dear Sir,

Your most recent posting which queries whether the Government of
Barbados would nominate an Opposition member for the post of UNFCCC
has been drawn to our attention. We can confirm that Senator Thompson
of Barbados has in fact been nominated by the Government because of
her experience and qualifications, the importance of climate change to
Small Island Developing States and the opportunity to place a well
qualified Barbadian in a critical post.

You may wish to note that while Ms Thompson is an Opposition Senator
she has long experience in  environment having been a Minister of
Environment since 1994. She  led the Barbados delegation to Kyoto and
was one of the Ministers in the closed door negotiations who crafted
the Bali Action Plan. At various times, along with the environment
portfolio, she was Minister of Energy, Housing and Lands, Physical
Development and Planning, and Health. She has also acted as Attorney
General. In recognition of her work in environment, in 2008, UNEP
awarded her the prestigious Champion of the Earth Award. Other
awardees include His Serene Highness Prince Albert of Monaco, and
several former high level leaders, Presidents Thabo Mbeki and Mikhail
Gorbachev, Prime Minister Helen Clark, now UNDP Administrator, Al
Gore, and former American Senator Tim Wirth Director of the UN
Foundation. Since leaving office she has led a legal and policy
practice specialising in energy and environment in which capacity,
working for agencies such as the OAS, Ms Thompson has reviewed energy
and environmental legislation and developed national sustainable
energy policies for 4 Caribbean countries. She lectures on energy and
ecology and has worked with NGOs world wide including Pew, SEEM,
CIWIL, and CCCCC. She has been endorsed by 350. Please see their
website www.350.org.

Senator Thompson holds an LLM in energy and environmental law from the
Robert Gordon University in Scotland, an MBA with distinction from the
University of Liverpool, UK, the dissertation of which was in energy
policy management, and an LLB from the University of the West Indies.
She was admitted to the Bar in 1987. She is also trained in Economics,
Renewable Energy, Alternative Dispute Resolution, Arbitration and
International Petroleum Negotiations. She has been involved in
negotiations involving legal matters since 1987 and matters involving
policy, climate change, financing of projects and programmes and with
trade unions  since 1994.

In every regard, politically, professionally and academically, Ms
Thompson is well equipped and suited to be Executive Secretary of the
UNFCCC. In addition the voice of SIDS has been an important one in the
UNFCCC process, not only because of their peculiar vulnerability but
because of the very high quality attitudes and perspectives they have
brought to the negotiating table. A female, developing country
candidate from a SIDS who is as knowledgeable and qualified as Senator
Thompson would bring a lot to the table and would be a bridge builder
between North and South, developed and developing countries.

We invite you to get to know Barbados’ candidate by reviewing the
attached documents. We would also be happy to let you have others if
you wish. Alternatively, Senator Thompson’s writings for Our Planet,
SEEM and other papers, journals and organisations are public and
available.

Thank you for your attention.

Respectfully,

Sonia Marville-Carter


Isada Law Chambers
“Saverne”
Monteith Gardens
Barbarees Hill
St. Michael
BB 12059
Barbados
W.I.
(246)435-4008 / 435-4009

The word Isada is taken from the vocabulary of the Arawaks, one of the
indigenous tribes of the Caribbean; pronounced ee-sah-duh, it means
“to do what is right and just.”

============

Download:

Senator Henrietta Elizabeth Thompson Bio – HET-BIO-mfa.pdf
Senator Henrietta Elizabeth Thompson CV – HET-CV-mfa.pdf

Download load in PDF format: UNEP-PR

Embargoed – Not for publication or broadcast until after 5am GMT on 28 January
Climate change links 2008 Champions of the Earth award winners
Green achievers from Bangladesh to New Zealand will be honoured at
international award ceremony in April in Singapore.

Nairobi, 28 January 2008 –From protecting the unique biodiversity of Yemen’s islands
to piloting climate-proofing strategies in Sudan and boosting conservation in Barbados,
the 2008 Champions of the Earth are making their mark across the planet.

Prince Albert II of Monaco, former US Senator Timothy E. Wirth and New Zealand’s
Prime Minister Helen Clark – whose country will host World Environment Day this year
with the theme ‘Kick the Habit: Towards a Low Carbon Economy!’ – are among the
seven environmental achievers chosen for this year’s awards, the United Nations
Environment Programme announced today.

The Champions of the Earth prize, which will be given out at a ceremony in Singapore
on 22 April, recognizes individuals from each region of the world who have shown
extraordinary leadership on environmental issues.

The other 2008 Champions of the Earth are: Balgis Osman-Elasha, a senior researcher
at Sudan’s Higher Council for Environment & Natural Resources; Atiq Rahman, the
Executive Director of the Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies; Liz Thompson, the
former Energy and Environment Minister of Barbados; andAbdul-Qader Ba-Jammal, the
Secretary General of the Yemen People’s General Congress.

All the winners have spearheaded outstanding initiatives in many different areas from
environmental policy to cutting-edge research, with a particular focus on sustainable
development and the fight against climate change.

The announcement comes on the eve of the 10th Special Session of the UNEP
Governing Council, which will bring together over one hundred ministers from around
the world inMonaco on 20-22 February. This year’s Governing Council will also focus on
the urgent challenge of climate change – specifically, the issue of mobilizing finance to
realize a low carbon world.

Achim Steiner, the UN Under-Secretary General and UNEP Executive Director said:
“Today, we face environmental challenges of unprecedented magnitude. More than
ever, our planet needs committed leaders and achievers like the 2008 Champions of the
Earth who spur real, positive change and fuel innovative solutions to environmental
problems. In doing so, these inspirational individuals demonstrate not only that action
and different development paths are possible but also the abundant opportunities arising
as a result of a transformation towards a green economy.”

———-
2008 Champions of the Earth

UNEP SPECIAL PRIZE

Rt. Hon. Helen Clark
By setting a carbon neutral goal for New Zealand, Prime Minister Helen Clark has put
her country at the forefront of today’s environmental challenges. Three major policy
initiatives launched by Miss Clark are also blazing new trails for sustainability and the
fight against climate change: the Emissions Trading Scheme; the Energy Strategy; and
the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy.
Miss Clark’s policies champion renewable energy and energy efficiency across key
sectors of the economy. Her government is also achieving substantial work on
environmental protection, from forestry and agriculture to improving public awareness
and boosting private sector involvement in sustainability.
New Zealand will be hosting this year’s World Environment Day –one of the principal
vehicles through which the United Nations stimulates worldwide awareness of the
environment and enhances political attention and action. The event will take place on 5
June 2008 with the slogan ‘Kick the Habit! Towards a Low Carbon Economy’.

AFRICA
Dr. Balgis Osman-Elasha
Dr. Balgis Osman-Elasha, a senior scientist from Sudan, is at the forefront of global
research on climate change. A leading author of the Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change (IPCC) reports, she has produced groundbreaking work on global
warming – the defining challenge of our era – in Africa, with an emphasis on northern
and eastern Africa.
Dr. Osman-Elasha’s emphasis on global warming and adaptation in Sudan is vital given
the strong interlinkages between climate change and conflict in the country. Her work as
a prominent researcher on climate change makes her a true role model for women in
Africa.
The award also recognizes Dr. Osman-Elasha’s efforts to educate Sudanese university
students about the issue of climate change, thus raising awareness among the country’s
new generation.

ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
Dr. Atiq Rahman
Dr. Atiq Rahman is an eloquent advocate for sustainable development from Bangladesh
– a country highly vulnerable to climate change and flooding. As one of the top
specialists in his field, the Executive Director of the Bangladesh Centre for Advanced
Studies (BCAS) transformed the NGO into a leading think-tank in South Asia on
sustainable development issues.
Dr. Rahman’s extensive publications on the subjects of environment and development in
Bangladesh are a reference for his peers, and he has also developed an innovative
post-graduate course on sustainable development and North-South dialogue.
With his national and international experience in environment and resource
management, Dr. Rahman’s expertise remains vital throughout the Asia Pacific region
and beyond as he helps to raise awareness of the hazards of global warming.

EUROPE
H.S.H. Prince Albert II of Monaco
One of Prince Albert II’s first acts as sovereign of Monaco was to sign the Kyoto
Protocol – an eloquent sign of his longstanding commitment to the environment. Prince
Albert has been a prominent voice on environmental issues since the early 1990s and
he has been strongly involved in raising awareness on climate change, leading an
expedition to the North Pole in 2006 to draw attention to the consequences of global
warming.
ThePrince Albert II of Monaco Foundation, which he created in 2006, works actively on
protecting the environment and promoting sustainable development, with a focus on
biodiversity loss, water and the fight against climate change. Prince Albert is also a
patron of the Billion Tree Campaign, which successfully led to the planting of well over a
billion trees across the planet in 2007.
Prince Albert has also shown remarkable commitment to sustainable development on
his home turf of Monaco. Under his leadership, Monaco is now applying an exemplary
policy on CO2 reduction in every sphere of society as well as in the business sector.

LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
H. E. Liz Thompson
Ms. Thompson has become one of the recognized leaders on environmental issues of
the Small Island Developing States.
During her time as Minister of Energy and the Environment of Barbados, she enacted a
range of progressive policies for sustainable development and environmental protection.
She also became a key voice to raise awareness of global warming in Barbados – a
country where the challenges of climate change and conservation are of particular
relevance.
Ms. Thompson has also played a role in environmental awareness and protection
across the Caribbean region. She has encouraged small island states to diversify their
economies, undertake sustainability assessments, and promote community-based
programmes that have positive environmental impacts.

NORTH AMERICA
Timothy E. Wirth
For the last thirty years, Timothy E. Wirthhas been an advocate for environmental
issues in the United States. As the president of the United Nations Foundation and
Better World Fund, Mr. Wirth has established the environment as a key priority and is
mobilizing strong resources to address crucial issues from biodiversity to climate change
and renewable energy.
A strong supporter of the Kyoto Protocol, Mr. Wirth was instrumental in raising
awareness and calling for policy action on global warming during his time as US
Undersecretary of State for Global Affairs.
Mr. Wirth was also a steadfast advocate on environmental issues during his time as a
member of the US Senate, when he engaged in a number of conservation and natural
resource issues in his state of Colorado. Mr. Wirth authored the Colorado Wilderness
Bill as well as other successful legislation on energy, conservation and environmental
protection.

WEST ASIA
H.E. Abdul-Qader Ba-Jammal
Mr. Ba-Jammal has had a truly pioneering influence on environmental protection in
Yemen – a country which faces acute challenges from water scarcity to desertification.
During his time as Minister and then Prime Minister, he established Yemen’s Ministry of
Water and Environment and Environment Protection Authority, solicited national and
international funding for environmental conservation and sustainable water
management, and implemented a series of groundbreaking environmental policies in
Yemen and its region.
Mr. Ba-Jammal also orchestrated conservation efforts for the Socotra archipelago, a site
of global importance for biodiversity. The Socotra conservation fund came into being
under his patronage, and the archipelago was listed as a UNESCO Man and Biosphere
reserve in 2003.
Among other achievements, Mr. Ba-Jammal also supported the declaration of several
marine and land protected areas in Yemen and established a state agency for the
development of Yemeni islands with a focus on marine resources conservation. Along
with Mr. Ba-Jammal’s work on Yemen’s water sector, all these projects serve as key
examples of environmental awareness in a region where water and conservation issues
are of vital importance – increasingly so in a climate-constrained world.
Notes to editors
Champions of the Earth is an international environment award established in 2004 by
the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). The annual prize rewards
individuals from around the globe who have made a significant and recognized
contribution globally, regionally and beyond, to the protection and sustainable
management of the Earth’s environment and natural resources. Candidates are judged
by a senior UNEP panel with input from UNEP’s regional offices.
Past Champions of the Earth winners include among others: Ms. Massoudeh Ebtekar,
the former Vice President of Iran; H.E. Mikhail Gorbachev of the Russian Federation;
H.R.H. Prince Hassan Bin Talal of Jordan; Jacques Rogge and the International
Olympic Committee; and Al Gore, the former Vice President of the United States.
The Champions of the Earth are invited to accept their award at an international
ceremony which will be held in Singapore on 22 April 2008. The event will be hosted in
conjunction with the Business for the Environment Summit (B4E), details of which can
be found on the UNEP website.
No monetary reward is attached to the prize – each laureate receives a trophy made of
recycled metal especially designed by the Kenyan sculptor Kioko and representing the
fundamental elements for life on earth: sun, air, land and water.
Background on the Champions of the Earth award and all the laureates can be found at
 www.unep.org or from UNEP’s communications division at
 championsoftheearth at unep.org.

——–
UNEP’s 10th Special Session of the Governing Council /Global Ministerial Environment
Forum will take place at thePrincipality of Monaco on 20-22 February 2008. More
information can be found at www.unep.org/gc/gcss-x/
For information on World Environment Day 2008, please visit
 www.unep.org/wed/2008/english/Abo…
For More Information Please Contact
Nick Nuttall, UNEP Spokesperson, on Tel: +254 20 7623084, Mobile: +254 733 632755,
or: +41 795965737, or e-mail:  nick.nuttall at unep.org
Anne-France White, Associate Information Officer, on Tel: +254 20 762 3088, Mobile:
+254 738 652793, or e-mail:  anne-france.white at unep.org
UNEP press release 2008/01

=========

###

Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on April 13th, 2010
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

The final list of candidates to the office of Secretary-General of the UNFCCC – as submitted by the March 31st, 2010 deadline:

Barbados has nominated Ms. Elizabeth Thompson,

Costa Rica has nominated Ms. Christiana Figueres,

Ecuador has nominated Ms. Maria Fernanda Espinoza,

Hungary has nominated Mr. Janoz Pasztor,

India has nominated Mr. Vijai Sharma,

South Africa has nominated MR. Marthinus van Schalkwyk,

and Pakistan has nominated  Mr.Tariq Banuri.

One of these three ladies and four gentlemen, will be charged with taking over the helm of UNFCCC from wherever Mr. Yvo de Boer will leave it on the eve of July 1, 2010. We wish the unlucky winner – GOOD LUCK!

———–

The great majority of these people are very well qualified and we are tempted to make the mistake of providing a first look at what an analysis of their chances when UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon sits down with this list and gets both-ears-full of advice from the 192 (or is it 194?) members of the UN, and the several hundreds of other would be helpers – from the UN staff, from International Organizations, from the NGOs, from the strong industry arm twisters (yes – there is a UN Global Compact that ranges from Coca Cola to heavy steel) and so on.

Let’s start!

The “North” has officially here just one name – Janos Pasztor from Hungary – all said he is from the North East. He is less of an affront to the G-77 then the previous two UNFCCC Chiefs that hailed from the Netherlands – a country very friendly to the South but geographically part of the UN North. Mr. Pasztor also has the inside track for another reason – he is the right-hand New York based Climate-man for UNSG Ban Ki-moon while having come to New York from the UNFCCC founding staff back in Bonn. We assume now that he and his staff will have to recuse themselves from the selection process. If the UN were to wish continuity – he would be the man – but will the 192 advise the UNSG to go for continuity? That is a very open question, as when the Copenhagen participants took their planes on the trip back home, they seemed to say that the process has changed, and it will revolve rather around that magic G2 + IBSA formula – (China, US) and (India, Brazil, South Africa) – to which the ALBA and others, including many members in what used to be the larger G-77 including the SIDS, had clear opposition.

There is no G-2 member among the 7 finalists, that would have been impossible, but two IBSA – India and South Africa are there. Will the rest of the G-77 agree to be lead by one of the newly created Super-group of 5 major emitters? Add to this the proverbial opposition of Pakistan to India, and the fact that some may say that a Dutchman from the South is not really different from a Dutchman from the North – sorry to make this remark but we read some internal opposition in South Africa to the nomination of Mr. Marthinus van Schalkwyk – justified or not – we do not know – but that this will be an argument about his confirmation – we are sure.

Pakistani Tariq Banuri is another UN insider as he is head of the Sustainable Development desk of UN DESA. He took over a moribund organization after the Zimbabwe debacle caused by a South African Government slap on the Sustainability concept, and revived  somewhat the deliberations of that body. He even worked nicely with the Israeli deputy Chair of the CSD. Will now the G-77 say – wait a minute – can we finally put climate into Sustainable Development? Just an interesting idea for an aside. Uniting back Sustainable Development with the UN efforts on Climate Change could be a welcome synergy – balsam to the G-77.

This leaves us with Latin America and the Caribbeans who might be over-represented. They have three candidates.

Let’s see – Costa Rica and Ecuador will split the Latin American interest – and it explains why the third IBSA – Brazil – did not present a candidate at all. On the other hand, the appearance of Barbados on the list of 7 is quite interesting. Besides having a good candidate, that has a track record of interest and involvement in the topics at hand, it seems they figured that a CARICOM endorsement of 14 countries of the Caribbean enhanced to the full figure of 43 when it comes to AOSIS, might amount to the beginning of a pressure group based on suffering rather then power – yes, we all know, the Island States will be the first to go under because of global warming – perhaps they indeed should be allowed to pull these negotiations out from the UN mud they are stucked-in at present time.

To the best of our knowledge – the UN upstairs still keep the information about the candidates close to their vests – no official announcement yet of anything we write here – but seemingly they will allow for a press conference this coming Thursday – April 15th – two weeks into the time that they should have released the above names according to minimum transparency – but did not release them as yet. Did you expect more transparency from the UN? You do not really mean that!

—————-

We have here some further information about the Candidate from Barbados:

Senator Elizabeth Thompson of Barbados has been nominated by the Government of Barbados because of her experience and qualifications, the importance of climate change to Small Island Developing States and the opportunity to place a well qualified Barbadian in a critical post.

While Ms Thompson is an Opposition Senator she has long experience in  environment having been a Minister of Environment since 1994. She  led the Barbados delegation to Kyoto and was one of the Ministers in the closed door negotiations who crafted the Bali Action Plan. At various times, along with the environment portfolio, she was Minister of Energy, Housing and Lands, Physical Development and Planning, and Health. She has also acted as Attorney General.
In recognition of her work in environment, in 2008, UNEP awarded her a prestigious Champion of the Earth Award as they did with with Prince Albert of Monaco, and several former high level leaders including Presidents Thabo Mbeki and Mikhail Gorbachev, Prime Minister Helen Clark, now UNDP Administrator, former Vice President Al Gore Now Environmentalisy Supreme, and former American Senator Tim Wirth Now Director of the UN Foundation.
Since leaving office Senator Thompson has led a legal and policy practice specializing in energy and environment in which capacity, working for agencies such as the OAS, Ms Thompson has reviewed energy and environmental legislation and developed national sustainable energy policies for 4 Caribbean countries.
She lectured on energy and ecology and has worked with NGOs world wide. She has been endorsed by the 350 NGO – Please see their website www.350.org.
Senator Thompson holds an LLM in energy and environmental law from the Robert Gordon University in Scotland, an MBA with distinction from the University of Liverpool, UK, the dissertation of which was in energy policy management, and an LLB from the University of the West Indies. She was admitted to the Bar in 1987. She is also trained in Economics, Renewable Energy, Alternative Dispute Resolution, Arbitration and International Petroleum Negotiations. She has been involved in negotiations involving legal matters since 1987 and matters involving policy, climate change, financing of projects and programmes and with trade unions  since 1994.
—————

We were honored receiving today an e-mail from St. Michael, Barbados, starting:

“Dear Sir,

Your most recent posting which queries whether the Government of
Barbados would nominate an Opposition member for the post of UNFCCC
has been drawn to our attention. We can confirm that Senator Thompson
of Barbados has in fact been nominated by the Government because of
her experience and qualifications, the importance of climate change to
Small Island Developing States and the opportunity to place a well
qualified Barbadian in a critical post.

You may wish to note that while Ms Thompson is an Opposition Senator
she has long experience in  environment having been a Minister of
Environment since 1994. She  led the Barbados delegation to Kyoto and
was one of the Ministers in the closed door negotiations who crafted
the Bali Action Plan…”
When I contacted therefore the Barbados Permanent Representative, I learned that Barbados submitted the name of their candidate to UNSG Ban Ki-moon already March 18, 2010 with the belief that the submitted names will be released in one bloc by the UN Secretariat – something that obviously did not happen yet. Whatever campaigning that was done publicly, to the best of our knowledge, as we posted on our web earlier, was initiated by the Missions from India, South Africa, and Costa Rica only.
Ambassador Christopher Hackett of Barbados has now also prepared a press release and we wish him all the best.

In every regard, politically, professionally and academically, Ms Thompson seems suited to the job of Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC. In addition the voice of SIDS has been an important one in the UNFCCC process, not only because of their peculiar vulnerability but because of the very high quality attitudes and perspectives they have brought to the negotiating table.

A female, developing country candidate from a SIDS, who is  knowledgeable and qualified as Senator Thompson is, would bring a lot to the table and could be a bridge builder between North and South, developed and developing countries.

We will continue to pursue the news from the UN – obviously.

###

Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on April 11th, 2010
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

Considering the high interest about the future of the UNFCCC and the financing methodology of the Copenhagen non-binding promises that we noted in the Indian press, the fact that there is an Indian candidate for the office of the UNFCCC chair, our quote today of an article in the Hindustan Times and our subsequent realization that similar quotes appeared also in other Indian papers, this of statements made by the Spokesman for the UN Secretary-General, and the further fact that the Chef de Cabinet of the UNSG is from India, we are now further surprised by an e-mail we got from an Indian Journalist – as follows:

“What do you think on the chance of Senator of Barbados Elizabeth H. Thomson becoming the Executive Secretary of UNFCCC effective 2nd July 2010?”

I looked up Google and found:

Hon. H. Elizabeth Thompson M.P.  Minister of Energy and the Environment in the 2006 government – now she is in opposition – a Senator.

We wonder if a government would suggest a member of the opposition, though we clearly would welcome a nominee from AOSIS. Further, as the UN is not releasing the full list of candidates, and even thumbs the collective UN nose at us, I do not have a grape-wine indication about a Barbados nominee.

###

Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on January 12th, 2010
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

Renewable Energy and RETScreen Workshop in Barbados, 16-18 Feb 2010

from: Roland Clarke PhD

You are invited to a workshop on renewable energy project analysis using RETScreen on 16-18 February 2010 at the Barbados Hilton Hotel.  This workshop is led by Dr. Roland Clarke, an international expert in renewable energy now resident in Barbados.

RETScreen is a clean energy analysis spreadsheet software that was developed by Natural Resources Canada, a Federal agency of the Government of Canada. It may be downloaded free of cost from www.retscreen.net . It is widely used having been downloaded by more than 215,000 users in 222 countries and territories, and is available in 35 languages.

The value of RETscreen to users is that it provides a platform for building technical models within Excel, communication with technical specialist, policy makers, economists and financiers, and provides for continuous learning.  It also shortens the lead time to perform pre-feasibility analyses and reduce external consulting costs.

This workshop will provide a hands-on introduction to the analytical methods employed by the most recent RETScreen Version 4, together with its resource and product databases, and its new Clean Energy Legal Toolkit. Analysis methods include energy systems, financial, economic, risk and sensitivity, and greenhouse gas analysis.

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to build project analysis models for photovoltaics, wind, biogas, and combined heat and power projects.

While the workshop will focus on imparting hands-on skills on the use of RETScreen, participants will also gain insights that will enable their self-learning about the algorithms and engineering behind the models.

This workshop is suitable for those involved in programme design, market planning, due diligence, investments, feasibility analysis, project finance, economics, infrastructure finance, business development, project development, private equity, banking, and financial analysis etc

Registration details and updates can be found at www.retscreen.net/ang/11_form2.ph….

This event builds on earlier workshops conducted by Dr Roland Clarke in Hanoi – Vietnam, Beijing China, Manila – the Philippines and Jakarta – Indonesia as a Consultant to the World Bank during November 2009. See web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL…

———-
Roland Clarke PhD (UPenn 95)
 www.retscreen.net/ang/11_form2.ph…

###

Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on April 3rd, 2008
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

THE REAL PROBLEM IS THAT WITHOUT A US INPUT – THE POZNAN MEETING IN DECEMBER 2008 IS JUST A WASTE OF TIME AND PUBLIC FUNDS. WE REPORTED THAT THE US PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE TO THE UN FOR THE PRESENT WASHINGTON ADMINISTRATION, AMBASSADOR ZALMAY KHALILZAD, TOLD US THAT HE WILL WORK WITH THE TRANSITION REPRESENTATIVES FOR THE INCOMING PRESIDENT THAT WILL BE ELECTED IN NOVEMBER, BUT WILL IT BE POSSIBLE WITH THIS HYBRID DELEGATION TO ACTUALLY SAVE THE PACE OF THE CLIMATE CHANGE NEGOTIATIONS THAT HAVE A SELF IMPOSED TIMETABLE ON THE ROAD TO COPENHAGEN? WHAT GOES ON THIS WEEK IN BANGKOK IS JUST THE TEA TIME ON THE WAY TO POZNAN – AND WE SEE ALREADY THAT THE WAY IS NOTHING BUT A TRACK IN THIN AIR.

BANGKOK, Thailand (AP), April 3, 2008, reproted by USA Today — The U.S. government insists it is deeply engaged in talks started this week on the world’s next climate pact, but other negotiators are already looking ahead to the next administration — and wondering what to expect.


Nations have less than two years to piece together a deal that scientists say is needed to cut greenhouse gas emissions and stop temperatures from rising so high they trigger disaster.

The high-stakes negotiations that began Monday in Thailand, however, are complicated by the coming U.S. presidential election.

Crucial details — such as how much Washington is willing to cut U.S. emissions — cannot be fully discussed until a new president takes office next year, slowing action on a final deal, some negotiators say. And it is far from certain what a new administration’s negotiating stance will be.

“The nature of the U.S. commitment … is unclear, and I suspect we’re not going to get a clear signal from the U.S. until after the next election,” said Ian Fry, a representative for the island nation of Tuvalu, which faces danger from rising sea-levels caused by global warming.

The world’s nations agreed last year at a conference in Bali to conclude a pact by December 2009. The agreement would succeed the first phase of the Kyoto Protocol warming agreement, which expires in 2012.

U.S. President George W. Bush has rejected the 1997 Kyoto pact, arguing it would hurt the American economy and was unfair because developing countries were not required to cut emissions. The agreement committed 37 wealthy nations to cut emissions to an average of 5% below 1990 levels by 2012.
Harlan Watson, the head of the U.S. delegation in Bangkok, insisted the administration was fully involved in the negotiations for the new pact.

Congress and leading U.S. presidential candidates have shown willingness to cap emissions. But Watson said the U.S. still wants commitments from major developing nations, no matter who is in the White House.

So far at Bangkok, however, he has limited his public statements to procedural issues.

“At this point in the process, there’s no enthusiasm for talking” about specific targets, Watson said.

“We don’t want to do anything that’s going to cut off the next administration’s options,” he said later.

U.N. climate chief Yvo de Boer acknowledged that one of the toughest parts of the haggling ahead — on how much industrialized countries will cut emissions — would best be discussed with a new U.S. administration.
The goal of the talks will be a complex document including emissions reduction commitments by industrialized countries; measures by developing countries; and financing and technology transfer to help them control emissions and adapt to the effects of rising temperatures.

###

Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on January 28th, 2008
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

From the spokesperson’s office of UNEP we were sent the following Press Release.

{But let us, note first that –  SustainabiliTank.info finds of particular interest the choice for the African region of
“Balgis Osman-Elasha, a senior researcher at Sudan’s Higher Council for Environment & Natural Resources,”
and we notice that there is no paragraph when explaining the choice as it was done for all other six choices – the special award, the US award, and the awards from the other five regions. Is this because the gentleman is an official of the government of Sudan and was proposed by the African Union in their routine of spiting the West?     We recreated the paragraph spacing in our posting.}

Climate Change Links 2008 Champions of the Earth Award Winners.

Green achievers from Bangladesh to New Zealand will be honoured at
international award ceremony in April in Singapore

NAIROBI, 28 January 2008 – From protecting the unique biodiversity of
Yemen’s islands to piloting climate-proofing strategies in Sudan and
boosting conservation in Barbados, the 2008 Champions of the Earth are
making their mark across the planet.

Prince Albert II of Monaco, former US Senator Timothy E. Wirth and New
Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark – whose country will host World
Environment Day this year with the theme “Kick the Habit! Towards a Low
Carbon Economy” – are among the seven environmental achievers chosen for
this year’s awards, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)
announced today.

The Champions of the Earth prize, which will be given out at a ceremony in
Singapore on 22 April, recognizes individuals from each region of the world
who have shown extraordinary leadership on environmental issues.

The other 2008 Champions of the Earth are: Balgis Osman-Elasha, a senior
researcher at Sudan’s Higher Council for Environment & Natural Resources;

Atiq Rahman, the Executive Director of the Bangladesh Centre for Advanced
Studies; Liz Thompson, the former Energy and Environment Minister of
Barbados; and Abdul-Qader Ba-Jammal, the Secretary-General of the Yemen
People’s General Congress.

All the winners have spearheaded outstanding initiatives in many different
areas from environmental policy to cutting-edge research, with a particular
focus on sustainable development and the fight against climate change.

The announcement comes on the eve of the 10th Special Session of the UNEP
Governing Council, which will bring together over 100 ministers from around
the world in Monaco from 20 to 22 February. This year’s Governing Council
will also focus on the urgent challenge of climate change – specifically,
the issue of mobilizing finance to realize a low-carbon world.

Achim Steiner, the UN Under-Secretary-General and UNEP Executive Director,
said: “Today, we face environmental challenges of unprecedented magnitude.
More than ever, our planet needs committed leaders and achievers like the
2008 Champions of the Earth who spur real, positive change and fuel
innovative solutions to environmental problems.

In doing so, these inspirational individuals demonstrate not only that
action and different development paths are possible but also the abundant
opportunities arising as a result of a transformation towards a green
economy.”

2008 Champions of the Earth:

UNEP SPECIAL PRIZE
Rt. Hon. Helen Clark

By setting a carbon-neutral goal for New Zealand, Prime Minister Helen
Clark has put her country at the forefront of today’s environmental
challenges. Three major policy initiatives launched by Miss Clark are also
blazing new trails for sustainability and the fight against climate change:
the Emissions Trading Scheme; the Energy Strategy; and the Energy
Efficiency and Conservation Strategy.

Miss Clark’s policies champion renewable energy and energy efficiency
across key sectors of the economy. Her Government is also achieving
substantial work on environmental protection, from forestry and agriculture
to improving public awareness and boosting private sector involvement in
sustainability. New Zealand will be hosting this year’s World Environment
Day – one of the principal vehicles through which the United Nations
stimulates worldwide awareness of the environment and enhances political
attention and action. The event will take place on 5 June 2008 with the
slogan “Kick the Habit! Towards a Low Carbon Economy”.

AFRICA                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Dr. Balgis Osman-Elasha

Dr. Balgis Osman-Elasha, a senior scientist from Sudan, is at the forefront
of global research on climate change. A leading author of the
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports, she has produced
groundbreaking work on global warming – the defining challenge of our era –
in Africa, with an emphasis on northern and eastern Africa.

Dr. Osman-Elasha’s emphasis on global warming and adaptation in Sudan is
vital given the strong interlinkages between climate change and conflict in
the country. Her work as a prominent researcher on climate change makes her
a true role model for women in Africa.

The award also recognizes Dr. Osman-Elasha’s efforts to educate Sudanese
university students about the issue of climate change, thus raising
awareness among the country’s new generation.

ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
Dr. Atiq Rahman

Dr. Atiq Rahman is an eloquent advocate for sustainable development from
Bangladesh – a country highly vulnerable to climate change and flooding. As
one of the top specialists in his field, the Executive Director of the
Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies (BCAS) transformed the
non-governmental organization (NGO) into a leading think-tank in South Asia
on sustainable development issues.

Dr. Rahman’s extensive publications on the subjects of environment and
development in Bangladesh are a reference for his peers, and he has also
developed an innovative post-graduate course on sustainable development and
North-South dialogue.

With his national and international experience in environment and resource
management, Dr. Rahman’s expertise remains vital throughout the
Asia-Pacific region and beyond as he helps to raise awareness of the
hazards of global warming.

EUROPE
H.S.H. Prince Albert II of Monaco

One of Prince Albert II’s first acts as sovereign of Monaco was to sign the
Kyoto Protocol – an eloquent sign of his longstanding commitment to the
environment. Prince Albert has been a prominent voice on environmental
issues since the early 1990s and he has been strongly involved in raising
awareness on climate change, leading an expedition to the North Pole in
2006 to draw attention to the consequences of global warming.

The Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation, which he created in 2006, works
actively on protecting the environment and promoting sustainable
development, with a focus on biodiversity loss, water and the fight against
climate change. Prince Albert is also a patron of the Billion Tree
Campaign, which successfully led to the planting of well over a billion
trees across the planet in 2007.

Prince Albert has also shown remarkable commitment to sustainable
development on his home turf of Monaco. Under his leadership, Monaco is now
applying an exemplary policy on CO2 reduction in every sphere of society as
well as in the business sector.

LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
H. E. Liz Thompson

Ms. Thompson has become one of the recognized leaders on environmental
issues of the small island developing States.

During her time as Minister of Energy and the Environment of Barbados, she
enacted a range of progressive policies for sustainable development and
environmental protection.

She also became a key voice to raise awareness of global warming in
Barbados – a country where the challenges of climate change and
conservation are of particular relevance.

Ms. Thompson has also played a role in environmental awareness and
protection across the Caribbean region. She has encouraged small island
States to diversify their economies, undertake sustainability assessments,
and promote community-based programmes that have positive environmental
impacts.

NORTH AMERICA
Timothy E. Wirth

For the last 30 years, Timothy E. Wirth has been an advocate for
environmental issues in the United States. As the president of the United
Nations Foundation and Better World Fund, Mr. Wirth has established the
environment as a key priority and is mobilizing strong resources to address
crucial issues from biodiversity to climate change and renewable energy.

A strong supporter of the Kyoto Protocol, Mr. Wirth was instrumental in
raising awareness and calling for policy action on global warming during
his time as United States Under-Secretary of State for Global Affairs.

Mr. Wirth was also a steadfast advocate on environmental issues during his
time as a member of the US Senate, when he engaged in a number of
conservation and natural resource issues in his state of Colorado. Mr.
Wirth authored the Colorado Wilderness Bill as well as other successful
legislation on energy, conservation and environmental protection.

WEST ASIA
H.E. Abdul-Qader Ba-Jammal

Mr. Ba-Jammal has had a truly pioneering influence on environmental
protection in Yemen – a country which faces acute challenges from water
scarcity to desertification. During his time as Minister and then Prime
Minister, he established Yemen’s Ministry of Water and Environment and
Environment Protection Authority, solicited national and international
funding for environmental conservation and sustainable water management,
and implemented a series of groundbreaking environmental policies in Yemen
and its re
gion.

Mr. Ba-Jammal also orchestrated conservation efforts for the Socotra
archipelago, a site of global importance for biodiversity. The Socotra
conservation fund came into being under his patronage, and the archipelago
was listed as a UNESCO Man and Biosphere reserve in 2003.

Among other achievements, Mr. Ba-Jammal also supported the declaration of
several marine and land protected areas in Yemen and established a state
agency for the development of Yemeni islands with a focus on marine
resources conservation. Along with Mr. Ba-Jammal’s work on Yemen’s water
sector, all these projects serve as key examples of environmental awareness
in a region where water and conservation issues are of vital importance –
increasingly so in a climate-constrained world.

Champions of the Earth is an international environment award established in
2004 by UNEP. The annual prize rewards individuals from around the globe
who have made a significant and recognized contribution globally,
regionally and beyond, to the protection and sustainable management of the
Earth’s environment and natural resources. Candidates are judged by a
senior UNEP panel with input from UNEP’s regional offices.

Past Champions of the Earth winners include, among others: Ms. Massoudeh
Ebtekar, the former Vice-President of Iran; H.E. Mikhail Gorbachev of the
Russian Federation; H.R.H. Prince Hassan Bin Talal of Jordan; Jacques Rogge
and the International Olympic Committee; and Al Gore, the former
Vice-President of the United States.

The Champions of the Earth are invited to accept their award at an
international ceremony which will be held in Singapore on 22 April 2008.
The event will be hosted in conjunction with the Business for the
Environment Summit (B4E), details of which can be found on the UNEP
website.

No monetary reward is attached to the prize – each laureate receives a
trophy made of recycled metal especially designed by the Kenyan sculptor
Kioko and representing the fundamental elements for life on earth: sun,
air, land and water.

Background on the Champions of the Earth award and all the laureates can be
found at www.unep.org or from UNEP’s communications division at
 www.unep.org/gc/gcss-x/

For information on World Environment Day 2008, please visit
 www.unep.org/wed/2008/english/Abo…

For more information, please contact: Nick Nuttall, UNEP Spokesperson, on
Tel: +254-20-762-3084, Mobile: +254-733-632-755, or: +41-79-596-5737, or
e-mail:  nick.nuttall at unep.org; or Anne-France White, Associate Information
Officer, on Tel: +254-20-762-3088, Mobile: +254-738-652793, or e-mail:
 anne-france.white at unep.org

UNEP News Release 2008/1

***********************************
Jim Sniffen
Information Officer
UN Environment Programme
New York
tel: +1-212-963-8094/8210
 info at nyo.unep.org
 www.nyo.unep.org

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on August 9th, 2007
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

Mr. Ban Ki-moon is spending quite a while in Barbados, meeting with the local Officials who had to interrupt their own vacations, with CARICOM, the general Caribbean organization, with Mr. Tony Blair, now the Special Envoy to the Middle East, Dealing with Sudan without being at the UN General Assembly in New York – Darfur an arid and impoverished region on Sudan’s western flank, where since 2003, more than 200,000 people have been killed and at least 2 million others have been displaced – and the UN achieved very little in four years since. Further, Mr. Ban Ki-moon reacted from Barbados to the announced meeting between the Presidents of North and South Korea, this without the physical pressure of the presence of the Heads of Mission from the major powers … not bad at all for Bridgeport, Barbados.

Mr. Ban Ki-moon is spending in Barbados an unspecified number of days after a two day visit with the UN troops in Haiti. He might travel back to New York tonight.

Also, Inner City Press has heard that:   “while the UN is trying hard to hold confidential the communications between the Secretariat and the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ), there’s been talk, including in the Staff Union’s August 7 meeting, of a $130 million request by the Secretariat for a new UN Headquarters in Iraq, a request of which the ACABQ is said to be critical.” Will the UN Secretary General be involved in the decision making process on this issue?

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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on April 20th, 2007
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

Not wanting to get involved in the debate about UN Security Council,or UN General Assembly, as venues for problems of Climate and Energy, Barbados found its own way of saying something positive.

Recognizing the impacts of Climate Change on the security of the developing countries in general and on his own Island State in particular, the Barbados Representative to the UN found it important to recognize the contribution of the April 17, 2007 discussion that was advanced by the UK, then he thinks that ECOSOC in September, at the Foreign Ministers level, could reinforce the topic before it goes to the UNFCCC meeting that will be held in Bali this December. He has thus found a practical location for the high level meeting the UN Secretary General mentioned earlier.

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