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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on June 2nd, 2014
by Pincas Jawetz (pj@sustainabilitank.info)

 

Cut-Backs at UNDP While Helen Clark in Belarus  …  Transparency I

 

By Matthew Russell Lee- The Inner City Press at the UN

 

UNITED NATIONS, May 31, more here — For many weeks there have been rumblings about “Helen Clark’s cut backs” at UNDP –  the UN Development Program.

   This week the rumbling spiked, with the UNDP staff union holding a meeting in the UN’s basement on May 29 to discuss the loss of up to 30% of UNDP’s jobs in New York.

 

  So on May 31 when Helen Clark re-tweeted praise of her visit to Belarus from her representative in the country, Sri Lanka national Sanaka Samarasinha, Inner City Press replied: “What about the UNDP layoffs?”

 

   The response came not from Helen Clark — who rarely if ever holds question and answer press availabilities at the UN in New York — but from Samarasinha, that the UNDP layoffs “must always be transparent & being fit for purpose. We strive toward that end.”

 

  Inner City Press thanked Samarasinha, adding it will try to make the proposed layoffs transparent. In that spirit, Inner City Press published now Helen Clark’s May 19 letter to the UNDP staff:

Dear Colleagues,

Last year the Executive Board approved a new Strategic Plan for UNDP, and since then the whole organization has been making the changes necessary to fully implement that plan. One of the three pillars of that plan was improving institutional effectiveness. To that end the organization has conducted significant reviews of its performance and we have all been involved in planning and implementing changes. At the country office level most of you are well on your way to completing the financial sustainability exercise which has led to many changes. Also, over recent months we have been going through a structural change exercise at the headquarters and regional levels to achieve a number of efficiency gains.

We committed to:

· Moving more of our policy and support services to the regional level so that we are closer to our country offices.

· Removing unnecessary duplication between bureaus

· Ensuring our functions are properly aligned through the organization to improve accountability and professional standards

 · Improving our span of control so that we have better career paths for younger staff.

· Reducing our spending on staff salaries so that we can stay within the integrated budget limits set by the Board in September.

· Ensuring we free up resources to invest in new areas required to deliver on the Strategic Plan

 

All Bureaus have been working hard on how to reorganize functions and reduce costs. This has not been an easy exercise and I must commend both my management and the many staff involved for their commitment to coming up with solutions.

We are now at the stage where we are ready to release new organograms for all bureau. This will happen on Wednesday this week (NY time). These organograms will reflect a much different UNDP from what we now have. Our services will be much more focused in the regions and we will be leaner. We will have significantly fewer D grade positions relative to other professional and general services grades.

 This means that many peoples jobs are affected, and we will be embarking on a realignment process aimed at being as fair and transparent as possible to fill the new positions.

Details of the new organograms will be released on Wednesday 21 May, and managers in all bureaux will be available to discuss with staff what the implications are for their bureau.

 

I understand, however, that some staff may wish to take the opportunity to leave UNDP, rather than compete for new positions. To facilitate this we will be making available a limited number of voluntary separation packages. The details associated with this are attached to this email, and if affected staff members are interested in taking this option they should discuss this with their manager.

All organograms will be made available on a dedicated intranet site, and at that time all staff at headquarters and working at regional level centres will receive formal notification that they are within the definition of affected staff. Bureau managers will then work with individual staff members to confirm the status of their existing position. Information will also be available on the processes which will be used for the realignment exercises which will have to follow. Let me assure you that these exercises will be designed to be as fair and transparent as possible and will ensure that existing rights under staff rules are respected.

 

Finally let me say to you all that I recognize that this is not an easy time for staff. I also know that we can be a stronger more effective development organization which can make real differences in millions of peoples’ lives. By demonstrating that to the world, I have no doubt that there are many exciting opportunities out there for UNDP to build on.

 

Helen Clark
UNDP Administrator

 

  Another source told Inner City Press that Clark wants to “force people, many women, many who are head of household, to be deported after one month [when their G-4 visas would expire], and force many staff who are just 2, 3, 4 years from early retirement age out, so they will miss out on their after-service health insurance. If they get away with this at UNDP, it will quickly spread to the rest of the UN system. Oh, and by the way, the men and women at D1, D2 and ASGs are unaffected.”

 

  This, Secretariat staff say, is similar to current Secretary General Ban Ki-moon’s mobility or “5 year rule” – now imposed on regular staff, but seemingly not applied Ban’s higher ranking friends. UNease is growing. Another description here, from IPS.

 

  The connection is that Helen Clark wants to replace Ban Ki-moon as Secretary General, despite the post as his successor said is being reserved for the Eastern European group which has never held it. Clark is banking on gender trumping geography, and job cutting seems to be her campaign issue for Western, donor countries.

  A well placed source tells Inner City Press Clark told management currently employed at UNDP to “drop what they are doing and work on her campaign” for S-G, they would be rewarded with a higher post in the Secretariat if she comes to replace Ban.

 

Footnote:    In the Secretariat, the hold-over staff union which barely fought Ban during its time in power now presents itself as supporting UNDP worker, and as… still the staff union … despite the December vote and the controversy since.

This rift only benefits those pushing for lay-off, just like the UN’s Censorship Alliance getting the first question and big room results in softball coverage of the UN, here. Matthew Lee says that he, Inner City Press, and the Free UN Coalition for Access will have more on this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cut-Backs at UNDP While Helen Clark in Belarus, Transparency I

 

By Matthew Russell Lee

 

UNITED NATIONS, May 31, more here — For many weeks there have been rumblings about “Helen Clark’s cut backs” at UNDP, the UN Development Program.

 

   This week the rumbling spiked, with the UNDP staff union holding a meeting in the UN’s basement on May 29 to discuss the loss of up to 30% of UNDP’s jobs in New York.

 

  So on May 31 when Helen Clark re-tweeted praise of her visit to Belarus from her representative in the country, Sri Lankan national Sanaka Samarasinha, Inner City Press replied: “What about the UNDP layoffs?”

 

   The response came not from Helen Clark — who rarely if ever holds question and answer press availabilities at the UN in New York — but from Samarasinha, that the UNDP layoffs “must always be transparent & being fit for purpose. We strive toward that end.”

 

  Inner City Press thanked Samarasinha, adding it will try to make the proposed layoffs transparent. In that spirit, we now publish Helen Clark’s May 19 letter to staff:

 

 

Dear Colleagues,

 

Last year the Executive Board approved a new Strategic Plan for UNDP, and since then the whole organization has been making the changes necessary to fully implement that plan. One of the three pillars of that plan was improving institutional effectiveness. To that end the organization has conducted significant reviews of its performance and we have all been involved in planning and implementing changes. At the country office level most of you are well on your way to completing the financial sustainability exercise which has led to many changes. Also, over recent months we have been going through a structural change exercise at the headquarters and regional levels to achieve a number of efficiency gains.

 

We committed to:

 

· Moving more of our policy and support services to the regional level so that we are closer to our country offices.

 

· Removing unnecessary duplication between bureau

 

· Ensuring our functions are properly aligned through the organization to improve accountability and professional standards

 

· Improving our span of control so that we have better career paths for younger staff.

 

· Reducing our spending on staff salaries so that we can stay within the integrated budget limits set by the Board in September.

 

· Ensuring we free up resources to invest in new areas required to deliver on the Strategic Plan

 

All Bureaux have been working hard on how to reorganize functions and reduce costs. This has not been an easy exercise and I must commend both my management and the many staff involved for their commitment to coming up with solutions.

 

We are now at the stage where we are ready to release new organograms for all bureau. This will happen on Wednesday this week (NY time). These organograms will reflect a much different UNDP from what we now have. Our services will be much more focused in the regions and we will be leaner. We will have significantly fewer D grade positions relative to other professional and general services grades.

 

This means that many peoples jobs are affected, and we will be embarking on a realignment process aimed at being as fair and transparent as possible to fill the new positions.

 

Details of the new organograms will be released on Wednesday 21 May, and managers in all bureaux will be available to discuss with staff what the implications are for their bureau.

 

I understand, however, that some staff may wish to take the opportunity to leave UNDP, rather than compete for new positions. To facilitate this we will be making available a limited number of voluntary separation packages. The details associated with this are attached to this email, and if affected staff members are interested in taking this option they should discuss this with their manager.

 

All organograms will be made available on a dedicated intranet site, and at that time all staff at headquarters and working at regional level centres will receive formal notification that they are within the definition of affected staff. Bureau managers will then work with individual staff members to confirm the status of their existing position. Information will also be available on the processes which will be used for the realignment exercises which will have to follow. Let me assure you that these exercises will be designed to be as fair and transparent as possible and will ensure that existing rights under staff rules are respected.

 

Finally let me say to you all that I recognize that this is not an easy time for staff. I also know that we can be a stronger more effective development organization which can make real differences in millions of peoples’ lives. By demonstrating that to the world, I have no doubt that there are many exciting opportunities out there for UNDP to build on .

 

Helen Clark
UNDP Administrator

 

  Another source told Inner City Press that Clark wants to “force people, many women, many who are head of household, to be deported after one month [when their G-4 visas would expire], and force many staff who are just 2, 3, 4 years from early retirement age out, so they will miss out on their after-service health insurance. If they get away with this at UNDP, it will quickly spread to the rest of the UN system. Oh, and by the way, the men and women at D1, D2 and ASGs are unaffected.”

 

  This, Secretariat staff say, is similar to current Secretary General Ban Ki-moon’s mobility or “5 year rule” – now imposed on regular staff, but seemingly not applied Ban’s higher ranking friends. UNease is growing. Another description here, from IPS.

 

  The connection is that Helen Clark wants to replace Ban Ki-moon as Secretary General, despite the the post as his successor said to be reserved for the Eastern European group which has never held it. Clark is banking on gender trumping geography, and job cutting seems to be her campaign issue for Western, donor countries.

 

  A well placed source tells Inner City Press Clark told management currently employed at UNDP to “drop what they are doing and work on her campaign” for S-G, they would be rewarded with a higher post in the Secretariat if she comes to replace Ban.

 

Footnote: In the Secretariat, the hold-over staff union which barely fought Ban during its time in power now presents itself as supporting UNDP worker, and as… still the staff union, despite the December vote and controversy since.

This rift only benefits those pushing for lay-off, just like the UN’s Censorship Alliance getting the first question and big room results in softball coverage of the UN, here. We’ll and the Free UN Coalition for Access will have more on this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cut-Backs at UNDP While Helen Clark in Belarus, Transparency I

 

By Matthew Russell Lee

 

UNITED NATIONS, May 31, more here — For many weeks there have been rumblings about “Helen Clark’s cut backs” at UNDP, the UN Development Program.

 

   This week the rumbling spiked, with the UNDP staff union holding a meeting in the UN’s basement on May 29 to discuss the loss of up to 30% of UNDP’s jobs in New York.

 

  So on May 31 when Helen Clark re-tweeted praise of her visit to Belarus from her representative in the country, Sri Lankan national Sanaka Samarasinha, Inner City Press replied: “What about the UNDP layoffs?”

 

   The response came not from Helen Clark — who rarely if ever holds question and answer press availabilities at the UN in New York — but from Samarasinha, that the UNDP layoffs “must always be transparent & being fit for purpose. We strive toward that end.”

 

  Inner City Press thanked Samarasinha, adding it will try to make the proposed layoffs transparent. In that spirit, we now publish Helen Clark’s May 19 letter to staff:

 

 

Dear Colleagues,

Last year the Executive Board approved a new Strategic Plan for UNDP, and since then the whole organization has been making the changes necessary to fully implement that plan. One of the three pillars of that plan was improving institutional effectiveness. To that end the organization has conducted significant reviews of its performance and we have all been involved in planning and implementing changes. At the country office level most of you are well on your way to completing the financial sustainability exercise which has led to many changes. Also, over recent months we have been going through a structural change exercise at the headquarters and regional levels to achieve a number of efficiency gains.

We committed to:

· Moving more of our policy and support services to the regional level so that we are closer to our country offices.

· Removing unnecessary duplication between bureau

· Ensuring our functions are properly aligned through the organization to improve accountability and professional standards

· Improving our span of control so that we have better career paths for younger staff.

· Reducing our spending on staff salaries so that we can stay within the integrated budget limits set by the Board in September.

· Ensuring we free up resources to invest in new areas required to deliver on the Strategic Plan

All Bureaux have been working hard on how to reorganize functions and reduce costs. This has not been an easy exercise and I must commend both my management and the many staff involved for their commitment to coming up with solutions.

We are now at the stage where we are ready to release new organograms for all bureau. This will happen on Wednesday this week (NY time). These organograms will reflect a much different UNDP from what we now have. Our services will be much more focused in the regions and we will be leaner. We will have significantly fewer D grade positions relative to other professional and general services grades.

This means that many peoples jobs are affected, and we will be embarking on a realignment process aimed at being as fair and transparent as possible to fill the new positions.

Details of the new organograms will be released on Wednesday 21 May, and managers in all bureaux will be available to discuss with staff what the implications are for their bureau.

I understand, however, that some staff may wish to take the opportunity to leave UNDP, rather than compete for new positions. To facilitate this we will be making available a limited number of voluntary separation packages. The details associated with this are attached to this email, and if affected staff members are interested in taking this option they should discuss this with their manager.

All organograms will be made available on a dedicated intranet site, and at that time all staff at headquarters and working at regional level centres will receive formal notification that they are within the definition of affected staff. Bureau managers will then work with individual staff members to confirm the status of their existing position. Information will also be available on the processes which will be used for the realignment exercises which will have to follow. Let me assure you that these exercises will be designed to be as fair and transparent as possible and will ensure that existing rights under staff rules are respected.

Finally let me say to you all that I recognize that this is not an easy time for staff. I also know that we can be a stronger more effective development organization which can make real differences in millions of peoples’ lives. By demonstrating that to the world, I have no doubt that there are many exciting opportunities out there for UNDP to build on .

Helen Clark
UNDP Administrator

 

  Another source told Inner City Press that Clark wants to “force people, many women, many who are head of household, to be deported after one month [when their G-4 visas would expire], and force many staff who are just 2, 3, 4 years from early retirement age out, so they will miss out on their after-service health insurance. If they get away with this at UNDP, it will quickly spread to the rest of the UN system. Oh, and by the way, the men and women at D1, D2 and ASGs are unaffected.”

 

  This, Secretariat staff say, is similar to current Secretary General Ban Ki-moon’s mobility or “5 year rule” – now imposed on regular staff, but seemingly not applied Ban’s higher ranking friends. UNease is growing. Another description here, from IPS.

 

  The connection is that Helen Clark wants to replace Ban Ki-moon as Secretary General, despite the the post as his successor said to be reserved for the Eastern European group which has never held it. Clark is banking on gender trumping geography, and job cutting seems to be her campaign issue for Western, donor countries.

 

  A well placed source tells Inner City Press Clark told management currently employed at UNDP to “drop what they are doing and work on her campaign” for S-G, they would be rewarded with a higher post in the Secretariat if she comes to replace Ban.

 

Footnote: In the Secretariat, the hold-over staff union which barely fought Ban during its time in power now presents itself as supporting UNDP worker, and as… still the staff union, despite the December vote and controversy since.

This rift only benefits those pushing for lay-off, just like the UN’s Censorship Alliance getting the first question and big room results in softball coverage of the UN, here.

 

We and the Free UN Coalition for Access will have more on this promises Matthew Lee.

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