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Posted on Sustainabilitank.info on February 18th, 2013
by Pincas Jawetz (PJ@SustainabiliTank.com)

We have completely forgotten about this posting – but discovered in our stats that today it was clicked by one of our readers.
Amazing – this also reminded us that Senator Hagel served also, just five years ago, as chair of the Senate Global Climate Change Observer Group and thus would be a good man to have when looking at Climate Change as a Security issue, as we are now pursuing it because of the Arria-formula meeting February 15, 2013, at the UN Security Council.

SEE AT THE END OTHER LINKS TO OLD ARTICLES OF OURS ABOUT CHUCK HAGEL STANDS IN THE PAST. WE THINK THESE ARTICLES OUGHT TO LEAD TO A STRONG ENDORSEMENT OF CHUCK HAGEL BEING APPOINTED TO A NEW PENTAGON _ ONE THAT LOOKS AT THE SECURITY THREATS OF TODAY AND A THOUGHT OUT RESPONSE TO PRESENT DANGERS i.e. THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE.

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THE UNCHANGED ARTICLE OF January 31,2007.

LUNCHEON DISCUSSION FEATURING U.S. SENATOR CHUCK HAGEL (R-NE). (from american-iranian.org)
US Senator Chuck Hagel (R-NE), the senior Senator from the State of Nebraska, will speak on “21st Century Challenges” at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and during a luncheon in New York City organized by the American Iranian Council. He has served as the chair of both the Senate Global Climate Change Observer Group and the Senate Oversight Task Force, and currently serves as the co- chair of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China. He also serves on the NATO Observer Group and several Senate committees, including the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations and the Select Committee on Intelligence.

Sen. Hagel takes a pragmatic, no-nonsense approach to both domestic and foreign policy, particularly in regard to national security, civil liberties, and the Iraq War. This approach and his willingness to work with his colleagues across the aisle on these issues have earned the respect of many Americans across the partisan divide. During the debate over the PATRIOT Act, he broke from the ranks of his fellow Republicans and criticized the bill, citing his oath of office, which compels him to defend the Constitution, not his party or president. Since then, he has become an outspoken critic of partisanship, and has also denounced the increasing politicization of national security. In a rejoinder to Karl Rove, he argued that “national security is more important than the Republican Party or the Democratic Party, and to use it to try and get someone elected will ultimately end up in defeat and disaster for that political party.”

His announcement in August of 2004 that he was considering a run for the White House set off a firestorm of speculation regarding his potential to win that office. Almost immediately after the 2006 midterm elections, Hagel’s name became increasingly bandied about as the definitive response to the public’s crisis of faith in the Republican Party. In an article entitled “Hagel’s Moment,” Washington Post columnist David Ignatius argued that the very positions that had distinguished him from the rest of the GOP now make him one of its most attractive candidates. In January of 2007, Newsweek columnist Jonathan Alter explicitly contrasted Senator Hagel’s positions on the War in Iraq with those of Senator John McCain, who, like him, is a decorated veteran of the Vietnam War, and is frequently suggested as a candidate for the 2008 presidential election. Alter made the case that Hagel is the more attractive of the two candidates for the Republican nomination, and perhaps the most attractive of all the candidates.

Sen. Hagel has made foreign policy one of his strengths during his tenure in office, and has also called for the United States to make every effort to deescalate the violence in the Middle East, calling for a “focused and creative diplomacy” in the region rather than further military action. With particular regard to Iran, he has suggested that “America’s strategic policy toward Iran must be comprehensive and include a wide-lens view of Iran and the entire Middle East,” and that it is a “strategic mistake to believe that the US can successfully pursue a policy that segments Iranian and US interests.” In his view, “there will be no lasting solution to the Iranian nuclear threat until the broader interests of Iran, the US, the region and the world are addressed.”

The luncheon will be held in New York City on Only a small number of seats will be available at this exclusive event, and therefore will it be open only to invited guests. The event will be free of charge to members of the American Iranian Council, faculty from the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, and their sponsors. If you are interested in attending, please contact Prof. Hooshang Amirahmadi, AIC President and Director of CMES, at (609) 509-2999 as soon as possible.

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SOME OF OUR PAST POSTINGS THAT ILLUMINATE THE CHUCK HAGEL PERSONA.


Monday, October 20th, 2008
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Friday, July 2nd, 2010
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Monday, January 7th, 2013
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Monday, January 14th, 2013
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